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HelicopterEngines Plugs Mufflers Fuel › how do you store your heli / tank / engine
12-15-2011 10:06 AM  5 years agoPost 1
coolgabsi

rrApprentice

Plano TX

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say from today till after christmas, I am not gonna fly the heli..

Should I leave the tank half full or something?

the engine last ran to idle.. was flooded... cause I am trying to break it in.. should I be leaving it like that? or should I turn my engine and get that fuel out?

how do you store your helis?

I am using simple stock clunk in the fuel tank not the magnet just so you know thats not a factor to consider.. lemme know!

People call me crash master... for a reason.. :P :D

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12-15-2011 12:43 PM  5 years agoPost 2
kcordell

rrElite Veteran

O Fallon, MO

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Some won't like it, but I ALWAYS run my engine dry after each flight, whether it's for 10 minutes or 10 months until the next one. Many will use afterrun oil when storing a motor for over the winter. This is also a good idea. The most important item is to empty the tank of exhaust fumes (if using muffler pressure), as they contain nitric acid and will ruin fuel tubing. Easiest way for that is after the last flight, fill the tank up, then empty it.
As far as motor storage, a few years ago I moved, didn't fly one particular model for 3 years. After the last flight I had run the motor dry, NO OIL, and when I decided to fly it again, changed all of the fuel tubing (including the tank), changed the glow plug, and it started right up.

Team Futaba, Team Synergy/Rail, Team Scorpion, Team Castle Creations, YS Engines, VelTye

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12-15-2011 05:39 PM  5 years agoPost 3
dcasole

rrApprentice

Dacula GA

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Wow , never realized why my in tank fuel line turned "gummy" after a while

Thanks for the tip !

Dave

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12-15-2011 06:31 PM  5 years agoPost 4
chopper_crazy

rrElite Veteran

Delphos, Ohio

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I always run mine dry. Most fuel that I have used has an after-run oil in it from what I have been told. Never had any problems. I normally change the glow plug when I'm ready to take the bird out of hibernation.

It's a complex, costly, glow powered anti-gravity machine!

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12-17-2011 03:37 AM  5 years agoPost 5
ticedoff8

rrKey Veteran

Morgan Hill, CA. USA

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Wow - never leave fuel in the engine at the end of the day!

If the engine stalled out because the idle was too rich, then you need to start it with the fuel line disconnected from the tank and let it run dry.

If you can't start it, disconnect the fuel line and then spin it with the starter to try to clear it out.

I had to stop flying last week and can't get back to flying until Jan 3. I ran my OS .91HZ-R until it was dry, then injected some Marvel Mystery Oil and spun it for 4 or 5 seconds. Then hang it from the wall.

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12-18-2011 04:12 PM  5 years agoPost 6
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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I'm with the rest of the guys. I just run the engine dry at the end of the last flight (crank until it won't fire anymore) by pinching the line. Not sure if that completely empties the regulator or not (91 HZ-R) but I think so.

I also store with a full tank even tho I'm not using muffler pressure. But the blowby gasses in the crankcase still get in the tank through the checkvalve in the pressurization system - not as caustic as actual exhaust, but still a little cruddy.

For after run for long term storage, I usually use automatic transmission fluid. Morgan fuels supposedly have corrosion inhibiters that allow you to just run dry and not use after-run. I havn't let one sit long-term with that tho, so couldn't tell you if it's really true.

Main thing is keep it dry and all the orifices plugged up.

LS

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12-18-2011 05:55 PM  5 years agoPost 7
wifeorheli

rrElite Veteran

reno, nevada usa

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Everything above is true. I run the hayes black clunk line and a MOAS magnet i leave my tank full at all times. Also i run my engine dry after each flight. I will pinch off the fuel line let it run till it dies then restart it till it wont start anymore.

Novarossi Motors U.S.A
www.PlanetHobby.com
Team Align
GrandRc.com
ZRC U.S.A. "PushGlo, SwitchGlo"

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12-18-2011 06:32 PM  5 years agoPost 8
dchekas

rrKey Veteran

Farmington, CT

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Guess I gotta be that guy.

I never run my engine dry. I just shut it off with throttle cut, pinch my fuel line, fill up the tank, and store it that way.

Haven't had any bearing issues, and my machines run good.

To each their own.

Team Align, Team Futaba, Team Byron Fuels, Team Thunder Power

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12-18-2011 07:10 PM  5 years agoPost 9
wifeorheli

rrElite Veteran

reno, nevada usa

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Any rust though?

Novarossi Motors U.S.A
www.PlanetHobby.com
Team Align
GrandRc.com
ZRC U.S.A. "PushGlo, SwitchGlo"

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12-18-2011 07:31 PM  5 years agoPost 10
dchekas

rrKey Veteran

Farmington, CT

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No, the inside of my engines have always been excellent.

Doing all this extra stuff, IMO, is a waste of time.

Team Align, Team Futaba, Team Byron Fuels, Team Thunder Power

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12-19-2011 12:23 AM  5 years agoPost 11
TruckRacer

rrNovice

Des Moines, Iowa

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I have never bought into the theory that all the openings to the engine should be capped off between flight days or during storage periods. Just the opposite, I usually remove the plug, make sure the exhaust is open, the piston at BDC and the carb is open during storage periods. I would much rather have the engine internals vent as much as possible to the atmosphere so the nasty gasses, excess nitro / alcohol can evaporate. Of course I run the engine dry at the end of the day. I've followed this basic system for over 40 years with both plank and heli engines with minimal bearing and rust problems. I have not used after run oils for the last 20 years.

I cringe a bit when I see guys putting a butt plug in their exhaust after a days flying as to me this just keeps all the nasty stuff inside where it can do damage. YMMV

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12-19-2011 05:58 AM  5 years agoPost 12
coolgabsi

rrApprentice

Plano TX

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ok so running dry got many votes... and keeping fuel in the tanks...

orifices of the engine is stil a question.. but if the fuel is gonna absorb water, it makes sense esp for using muffler pressure to plug the muffler so the fuel doesnt absorb more water and not produce enough power..

right?

well my engine has been flooded with fuel and has been lying like that since i made this post.. I will try to empty it out... and also the tank mainly because I am taking it apart..

but interesting y'all.. keep your suggestions coming!

People call me crash master... for a reason.. :P :D

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12-19-2011 02:56 PM  5 years agoPost 13
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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I would much rather have the engine internals vent as much as possible to the atmosphere so the nasty gasses, excess nitro / alcohol can evaporate
Yikes! Hopefully you're not storing any expensive engines that way (such as a full scale).

This is the exact opposite of proven correct engine pickling procedures. The main reason for sealing the openings is to prevent water (via humidity) from entering the engine and getting onto any rusting parts (i.e. roller bearings, etc).
This is absolutely critical on alcohol burners, since as we all know, alkie absorbs water like a sponge. Water and steel internal engine parts don't mix!

You may have gotten away with this, but this is very highly NOT recommended, especially as the engine gets more expensive!

LS

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12-19-2011 02:58 PM  5 years agoPost 14
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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orifices of the engine is stil a question.. but if the fuel is gonna absorb water, it makes sense esp for using muffler pressure to plug the muffler so the fuel doesnt absorb more water and not produce enough power..

right?
Yes, right! This is precisely why sealing the engine is a good idea for long term storage - water/humidity is the main enemy that sealing it up combats....

LS

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12-20-2011 12:06 AM  5 years agoPost 15
TruckRacer

rrNovice

Des Moines, Iowa

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Unclejane,

So you would rather seal up the engine and leave the alcohol / water residue inside to do its damage. Is it any wonder some guys have so many bearing problems. If left open, the alcohol and other combustion byproducts can and will evaporate leaving only a bit of oil residue behind. I would suggest you not knock my methods until you try them. I have years of use on my side and there have been many very expensive engines during that time that proves the method works and yes, my environment is extremely humid in the summer months so that is not a factor. If you lived nearby, you would be welcome to come over and remove the back cover from any of my engines to inspect them.

FYI, I don't leave my tanks full but do rinse the combusiton vaoprs out with a refill and defuel between uses. Very minimal clunk line problems, just normal annual replacement.

And who said anything about full scale storage and pickling engines. If our model engines were truly pickeled between uses,you would almost have to remove the engine each time just to clean out the pickling residue before you could use the engine. Certainly you wouldn't have any rust but the engine wouldn't be of much use either until it was thoroughly cleaned out.

Be open to the fact that maybe some other storage method than what you currently use might actually work!

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12-20-2011 12:58 AM  5 years agoPost 16
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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So you would rather seal up the engine and leave the alcohol / water residue inside to do its damage.
Sealing the engine is what keeps water _out_ of the engine. You purge it of the alcohol and any other water residue by running it dry and adding any preservative oil _before_ you seal it up.
I would suggest you not knock my methods until you try them.
There's no need to try them before knocking them - it's already clear and obvious that they're bad methods. Like I said above, the point of sealing the engine up is to keep water and other contaminants _out_ of the engine.
And who said anything about full scale storage and pickling engines. If our model engines were truly pickeled between uses,you would almost have to remove the engine each time just to clean out the pickling residue before you could use the engine. Certainly you wouldn't have any rust but the engine wouldn't be of much use either until it was thoroughly cleaned out.
True, depending on how much prep you do. If you're talking years, then the percentage of time you'll spend returning the engine service is a small fraction of the time it'll be stored, so it's not a big cost overall to do a major pickling operation (removing of accessories like plugs, etc., lots of pickling oil, sealing it up etc.)

But leaving it fully open to the atmosphere... wow.. just wow, that's a bad idea no matter how long it's going to stored.....
Be open to the fact that maybe some other storage method than what you currently use might actually work!
Rejecting an idea like this one isn't being closed minded, it's being smart with ones engine and money! Don't use this method, folks, if you value your engine....

LS

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12-20-2011 01:50 AM  5 years agoPost 17
TruckRacer

rrNovice

Des Moines, Iowa

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When you stop a 2 stroke engine, even if you run it dry there is exhaust residue, fuel residue and water vapor throughout the engine and exhaust system. Cap it off and it remains in the engine to do its damage and it has no escape route. Go ahead, leave it in there and watch the bearings corrode away if you will, while my engines have minimal corrosion and rust.

This has almost nothing to do with full scale storage and I don't know why that was ever brought up.

I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on this one and your logic has merit .... as does mine.

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12-20-2011 01:59 AM  5 years agoPost 18
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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When you stop a 2 stroke engine, even if you run it dry there is exhaust residue, fuel residue and water vapor throughout the engine and exhaust system.
But it's a very miniscule amount. And in the process of pickling the engine, where it's turned over a few times, more of the exhaust residue there might have been in the engine is purged out. True you can't get rid of all of it, but you're not talking about a large remains either.
Cap it off and it remains in the engine to do its damage and it has no escape route.
But leave it completely open to the atmosphere and that charge of humidity gets refreshed and refreshed and... You always have a nice new fresh charge of humidity and contaminants going into that engine at all times!
This has almost nothing to do with full scale storage and I don't know why that was ever brought up.
I only brought that up as an example where tens of 1000's of bucks are on the line with bad storage procedures and how therefore it's doubly important that they be avoided. I've never seen yours ever recommended by any mechanics I've ever been acquainted with (and there's likely a good reason for that).
I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on this one and your logic has merit .... as does mine.
There's no visible logic to your approach as it accomplishes quite the opposite of what the goal of engine storage is. The correct procedure OTOH, sealing it up, does accomplish that goal.

LS

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12-20-2011 02:11 AM  5 years agoPost 19
TruckRacer

rrNovice

Des Moines, Iowa

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I see where this discussion is going nowhere but .... strange how many earlier posts stated they just shut the engine down after a last flight and really didn't do anything special until the next flying day. They even reported no unusual engine problems or excessive rust, etc. Hmmmm, would seem to support my logic a bit. Oh well, I'm out of this one.

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12-20-2011 02:19 AM  5 years agoPost 20
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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That's because the engine sits for only a day or a couple of days. Not enough for anything in the atmosphere to get in and get a foothold.

Leave it wide open for 2 years, OTOH, and compare the results to one that's sealed up... Then you'll get an idea of why your recommendation is a bad one....

LS

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