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HelicopterMain Discussion › Logo 400 - Am I Crazy?
08-01-2011 10:35 PM  6 years agoPost 1
hopetohover

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New Jersey

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Guys,

How crazy an idea is it to go with a Mikado Logo 400 as my first helicopter? I'm learning on the sim, (I suck, but keep practicing)and hope to get some help locally with setup, but not sure yet on that.

Am I crazy? Am I jumping into the deep end of the pool?

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08-01-2011 10:43 PM  6 years agoPost 2
HeliDawg

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Spokane, WA United States

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Bigger is better

I started with a Blade 400 and that was a bad choice for me. Went to a 450 SE and absolutely love flying it. Just finished building a Trex 500 and should maiden fly tonight. Point is if you can afford big, go big.
Bigger means more stability but on the other end of that if you crash, tends to be a bit more expensive to repair.

Dang I am upside down!

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08-01-2011 10:49 PM  6 years agoPost 3
hal

rrApprentice

canada

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Essentially the mikado 400 is a 500 size heli, it would be a very nice first heli. Parts are cheap and won't break bank learning.

I say go for it. Put some decent stuff in it and have fun.

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08-01-2011 10:49 PM  6 years agoPost 4
Al Austria

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Gainesville, FL

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Really, there aren't many "bad" types of helicopters to start with. Anything electric is bound to increase your learning curve as there is no tuning involved, aside from the standard mechanical and electronic setup.

The Logo 400 is actually an excellent size machine to start with. Not too small and difficult to track visually, and large enough that it will exhibit a good degree of stability. The only knock on the Logo 400 in particular is that it has a non-driven tail rotor, meaning there is no tail control during motor-off conditions(autorotations). That may not necessarily a deal breaker anyhow. All things considered, the Logo 400 is well within the scope of a reasonable beginner helicopter, definitely nothing crazy about starting with one.

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08-01-2011 11:06 PM  6 years agoPost 5
bhoff

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houston texas

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i personally think thats a good idea..logo does run a little expensive on parts but if you have the money then do it..you would be getting one of the nicest helis in the market, never a bad idea to go with good quality. also something to think about, getting parts for mikado means usually ordering from online. most hobby shops do not carry mikado parts, so you wont be able to look at the size etc. on parts. where as align parts run a little cheaper and are EVERYWHERE! but again i think mikado is VERY good quality. go for it!

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08-01-2011 11:13 PM  6 years agoPost 6
danny_isr

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Colorado

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i started with a LiteMachine 110 if anyone remembers. But my first "real" heli was the Freya 60. Few people told me not to start with that because of high crash cost but it really wasn't a big deal.

There is that fear factor that bigger machine have , and that may slow you down b/c you wont try new thing as quickly as in a smaller less intimidating machines.

Regarding electric Vs Nitro ....my take is actually nitro will give you more stick time. You Refuel and you back learning hovering.
You can do that all day long.

yes you need to set up the needle , but you do that once and that is it (ask someone for help on that). Here and there i had to tweak mine but not more . And definitely with just learning to hover you are not pushing the engine to the limits anyways.
So if you run the engine on the rich side and it's a click or two off it wont matter anyways.

Freya SST 91,Trex450 SE,Trex 600E

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08-01-2011 11:19 PM  6 years agoPost 7
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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What a perfect heli to start with, The only problem I see is that you will have to try other heli's before you really know how good a Logo is.

Bill Whittaker

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08-01-2011 11:21 PM  6 years agoPost 8
Heli-on

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Southern Cali, CA - USA

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The difference in choosing your first heli's size can be the difference between a trip to the emergency room and a trip to the morgue. IMO, anything larger than 325 mm blades and you're asking for trouble. A simple bump up to a 500-class and you're adding a lot of extra mass and blade inertia. Choose wisely and remember those blades WILL hurt when they hit you. The guy at my LHS would have no quams at all setting you up with a 600.

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08-02-2011 12:31 AM  6 years agoPost 9
Havoc

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Ky.

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IMO, anything larger than 325 mm blades and you're asking for trouble
How did a few decades of fellow nerds manage to survive without those tiny POS electrics.

Get the 400. Then if you really want to walk on the edge, maybe drive a mile without a seatbelt.

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08-02-2011 12:36 AM  6 years agoPost 10
OLROY

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Wichita Ks

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One of my 1st heli was a Raptor 50 and I'm still alive. Doesn't matter what size it is...like my dad always told me..."A GUN IS ALWAYS LOADED " unloaded guns is what kills people.

Just remember any size heli can hurt youtrust me 325mm blades hurt just look in my gallery ..that gun was unloaded

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08-02-2011 01:06 AM  6 years agoPost 11
Al Austria

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Gainesville, FL

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Yep, started with a 30 size nitro(550 size electric). Built and setup by myself when I was 14 and relatively inexperienced. Sounds like a recipe for disaster, the difference is I brought it to the local expert who checked it over and flew it for the first time. Still here 9 years later.

Best advice is to hook up with someone who is experienced with building/setup as well as flying. Learn as much as you possibly can from them, and the forums as well.

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08-02-2011 01:21 AM  6 years agoPost 12
yannick

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South Korea

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Starting with Flybarless?

I started with a Shluter Magic. It was scary but I also survived.

Go with the 400, even the 500 if you can afford it.

Now I may have missed something but I understood that Mikado was not doing any FB helis anymore, so are you going to start with a FBL Heli?

Is it me or this time the ground was higher than last time??

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08-02-2011 01:23 AM  6 years agoPost 13
McKrackin

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Lucasville,Ohio

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I would never consider starting any smaller with my experiences to date.

Those little 450's(325mm bladed) and smaller are too much hassle to fly and work on.
The little ones are a ton of fun after you stop crashing.

I literally never use the word literally right.

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08-02-2011 02:10 AM  6 years agoPost 14
bopshi

rrApprentice

greenport ny

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If noise is not a problem go with hawkpro 30. U can hover all day if u have quick field charger for reciever batt. I now own logo 500 fb model and that is correct. Logo no longer sells or supports fb helis. I learned on hawk pro and if u reck it u can buy a whole new one for 200 bucks. The Logo is a much finer machine for sure.Id learn on cheap and big then go for exspensive and better Logo dave

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08-02-2011 02:55 AM  6 years agoPost 15
hopetohover

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New Jersey

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Thanks guys, great advice here!

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08-02-2011 04:01 AM  6 years agoPost 16
drdot

rrElite Veteran

So. California, Orange County.

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fwiw..

Just a different perspective....

The mCPx has changed the equation for learning...A buddy got bit by the big, wanted to do something more than his toy grade co-ax....I thought a bit, then recommended the MSr....He messed with it for about a month, then along came the X...AS I couldn't argue him into something larger, and figuring he'd quit after a couple crashes...Why not....
Long story short, he is now on his fourth month of flying, and can do flips, rolls, and a tiny bit of inverted hover....
He is not a kid, or even a young man...But the mCPx brings a tremendous amount of crashability to the equation...Being able to straighten out the blades and usually fly is huge for a beginner..

Don't get me wrong...The heli is certaily not perfect....But a person can learn to fly sucessfully on a 1.5 oz heli if they persevere..

(No, I'm not a Horizon rep.....)

John.

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08-02-2011 04:13 AM  6 years agoPost 17
OLROY

rrKey Veteran

Wichita Ks

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+1

If only they had a mcpx before my first POS Blade 400
Couple years ago....luv my mcpx

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08-02-2011 04:29 AM  6 years agoPost 18
Havoc

rrElite Veteran

Ky.

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I've known people to approach it that way. It's not a bad approach but if you have a sim and a good field, you will not stay content long. You don't want to go through motions (and money) that are not needed. I buddy boxed a guy on his blade 400 a few times and he soloed on very windy day. But he could have done the same on a larger model and skipped the cost of the little machine. Which he quickly sold in favor of a larger helicopter. Plus it would handle the wind better and be easier to see (although I may be biased on that as the instructor trying to see it). The blade and the mcpx are fun helicopters to play with in their own right. But as a required stepping stone? No. Certainly not with a sim and a club.

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08-02-2011 11:12 AM  6 years agoPost 19
Richardmid1

rrProfessor

Leeds, England

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For a complete beginner ide recommend no larger than a 450. You want something that you can practice on in your garden/yard.

You just will not progress as fast starting with a 500 or larger heli here's why:

A. Unless you have a huge garden/yard you'll have to travel to a field to fly it.

B. Parts are much more expensive, exactly what you don't want when your learning!

C. Fear factor, both for safety and the cost of crashing, this will seriously hinder your learning curve.

D. People are talking rubbish when they say larger helis can handle wind better and are more stable, thats down to the setup.

Buy a belt drive 450 and wood blades and a stack of spares instead of the Logo 400.

And the thing is, once you have mastered the 450, upright and even some inverted you can jump straight to a 50/600 or 90/700!

60% of the time, it works every time!

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08-02-2011 11:31 AM  6 years agoPost 20
Jeff polisena

rrElite Veteran

westpalmbeachflorida usa

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If your in it to stay start with a sim and a 600 trex wether it nitro or electric . You get a complete flying setup for starters then as you crash and learn you can up grade but airframe will let you grow as fast as you want and you won't grow out of it . Nitro will give you longer flights and less knowledge but noise. The electrics will be cleaner and quiet but short flights can be frustrating . At the end you will have the same money invested .

I stole it ,flew it and gave it back ;)

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HelicopterMain Discussion › Logo 400 - Am I Crazy?
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