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HelicopterMain Discussion › Not all airplane pilots can fly helis. But can all heli pilots fly planks?
01-10-2011 06:25 PM  7 years agoPost 1
Rogman88

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West Monroe, LA

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Fair assessment?

We need a fresh topic to argue so I just figured why not try this one.

High Voltage just works better

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01-10-2011 06:30 PM  7 years agoPost 2
Wave

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Illinois

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Planks still require skill but I think a heli pilot can learn to fly a plank at a much faster rate than a plank pilot could learn to fly a heli.

Plank pilots kinda use the left stick in a "set it and forget" fashion.

They have to learn to fly both sticks.

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01-10-2011 06:44 PM  7 years agoPost 3
Hellsiege

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Colorado Springs, CO

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Heck yeah a helicopter pilot can fly a plank, and to boot they usually fly it correctly as they know how to use rudder and not yank/bank.

I had a similar debate with my uncle who races RC cars on a semi-pro level (mugen sponsor, travels country to race). Told him I could learn to race cars at his level before he could fly a helicopter (more than hovering / sport flying). Well kind of a draw; one year later he can forward fly a raptor 30 with a loop/roll here and there and I've won races but still a good 10-15 seconds slower then he is per lap on the track.

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01-10-2011 06:45 PM  7 years agoPost 4
Copter Doctor

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Enterprise/ft.rucker ,al- home of army aviation

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i have taught folks to fly both and the heli guys seem to pick up airplanes just a tad quicker than the plane guys pick up helis. this is with zero time for each. the heli guys find airplanes much more relaxing and the plane guys fine helis a bit more challenging.
after flying airplanes, picking up helis happens a little quicker than one with no flying exp at all.
for the heli guys, it appears to be even quicker learning an airplane since both are very similar in fwd flt.
learning to land an airplane seem to pose the most challenge for a heli guy since you dont stop moving fwd til AFTER you touch the ground.

drive a rotary, fly a rotorcraft

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01-10-2011 06:48 PM  7 years agoPost 5
Rototerrier

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Fayetteville, GA - USA

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The only thing a good heli pilot has to learn about planks are landings. Everything else is the same as forward flight on a heli but as others have stated...heli pilots will actually fly the rudder...which will make them better right out the gate.

I prefer 3D foamies though. Flying a regular plank is just boring these days. I'd rather watch grass grow.

Gassers Rule, Nitros Drool, Electrics...uhhh...Joule?

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01-10-2011 06:48 PM  7 years agoPost 6
Funky Trex

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Westerville, OH - USA

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I started flying helis a few years before trying planks. I tried them a few times on the sim and they seemed fairly easy for basic flying so I bought one. I was able to fly it back and forth and do simple loops, rolls, etc on my first day out with the plane. It is a bit tricky and I kept dropping the throttle when flying upside down but I quickly got over that mistake. I have wrecked a few planes since but only because I would fly beyond my means and try stupid things Overall, I think my heli skills trasferred very quickly into flying planes.

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01-10-2011 07:18 PM  7 years agoPost 7
copterklutz

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Western Massachusetts

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I tried an airplane twice......I had a 3D plane that was so easy to fly it became boring after a half dozen flights. The only thing that was interesting was the landing.

The second plane was kinda crappy and it didn't fly that well so I gave up. I'm find helis more fun...






" Well, Um.... it's fixable......"

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01-10-2011 07:20 PM  7 years agoPost 8
Cowjock

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Pa.

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I've always said if you can fly a heli you can fly a plank. I was the other way around flew planks for years and it was weird going to a heli because of the left stick thing(it actually had to be used). I actually have to be careful now with the throttle if I fly a plank, every time I'm inverted with a plank all I want to pull neg pitch.

Plank guys going to helis, I successfully did it. But I know there are plank guys out there who are just barely good enough to land a plank with any kind of decent throttle control, I can't even imagine them even trying to control the collective on a heli not to mention the cyclic at the same time.

Damn that ground is hard! When's the right time to get out of this money sucking hobby?

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01-10-2011 07:29 PM  7 years agoPost 9
chopper_crazy

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Delphos, Ohio

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A long long time ago I learned how to fly airplanes which is what got me into remote control. I've been flying helis now for about 7 years and last spring I flew I guy's airplane. It's the first time I have flown an airplane in 7 years. It was like riding a bike. You never forget it. Might not be the smoothest flight but I took it off and landed in one piece It would be tougher to do that with helis after a 7 year lay off.

It's a complex, costly, glow powered anti-gravity machine!

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01-10-2011 07:38 PM  7 years agoPost 10
heli-cuzz

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Pittston, Pa. USA

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IMO planks are easy until you start trying real 3D plank maneuvers, not just banging the sticks around.
The rolling harrier for instance is a tough move. A rolling loop can be tough too.
Sure with a 3D plank you can usually get away with banging the sticks up high, but to be precise and fly low 3D is another level of flying that requires lots of practice.

Fury 55 NIB Furion6 CGY750 fbl helicopter-Frenzy CGY750 fbl nitro-Frenzy fbl NOBAR90

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01-10-2011 07:48 PM  7 years agoPost 11
Gyronut

rrProfessor

Martinsville In.

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I flew planks for 20 yrs before starting helis and wondered why I started so late....

Rick

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01-10-2011 08:30 PM  7 years agoPost 12
Supertoyz

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Colchester, VT

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Heli's are definitely harder to learn. I started with heli's about 8 years ago. I'd say I'm a novice heli pilot at best. I decided to try my hand at planes this spring.....how can you resist when you can pick up a nice BNF brushless foamy for less than a tail servo costs. I found it really enjoyable, and considering the crazy low cost it's much less stressfull than flying heli's. I ended up buying about 8 planes this year including 2 EDF's. I'd say that after six months of flying planes that my heli-plane skills are about equal. 6 months vs. 8 years, granted I had the basic skills in place when I started flying planes which accellerated the learning curve. I find planes to be easier from every aspect but landing. Overall I think it's good to learn both. My goal is to be well rounded and competent at flying most models.

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01-10-2011 08:38 PM  7 years agoPost 13
Rogman88

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West Monroe, LA

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The biggest challenge as stated is landing a plank. Landing a scale warbird can be a challenge due to tip stalling. "Feeling" a tip stall (seeing the wing rock subtly) is something that comes with experience and I would hypothesize that any heli-only pilot would have a pretty good chance of stalling and dropping a wing on some planes on landing. The angle of attack and speed on landing of some planks have low tolerances that a heli pilot just wouldn't know. So to say that "if you can fly a heli, then you can fly a plane" as I've heard said to newcomers at my own field may not necessarily be true, because a major part of flying is landing the thing. Not all planes land the same. Delta's land at a higher angle of attack, flat bottoms tend to float down the runway and don't want to come down. Taildraggers require right rudder feathered on take off to counter torque and avoid the dreaded 360 spin of death. Then landing in cross wind poses another challenge.

High Voltage just works better

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01-10-2011 08:41 PM  7 years agoPost 14
OICU812

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Edson, Alberta, Canada

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After a year of flying helis I finally tried a plane, it was pretty simple, landing was abit of a try, but still in comparison very easy. Most heli guys that have gotten their basics can probably hover their plane within first flights it seems.

...Once upon a time there were Nitros, flybars and frequency pins...

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01-10-2011 09:00 PM  7 years agoPost 15
koppter

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Virginia

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i will admit the basic skills are easier with an airplane, and the reason for that has a lot to do with the basic design of both. it is easy to design airplanes with a high degree of inherent stability; whereas the same is not true of helis, which can fly in virtually any direction. But once the basic skills are mastered, airplanes require a set of skills and knowledge that are well beyond the reach of most heli pilots.

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01-10-2011 09:01 PM  7 years agoPost 16
Rogman88

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West Monroe, LA

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But once the basic skills are mastered, airplanes require a set of skills and knowledge that are well beyond the reach of most heli pilots.
Well put!!!
I still see planker pilots who've beenflying for years bouncing airplanes down the runway, not compensating for prop torque and letting the airplane yaw into the flight path of the pits, people diving for cover etc...

High Voltage just works better

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01-10-2011 09:45 PM  7 years agoPost 17
OICU812

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Edson, Alberta, Canada

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koppter while airplanes of course take their own knowledge base flying 3d moves on a plane I would not say is beyond heli pilots. Good friend and xfc level planker pilot Patrick Stubbs flies a plane amazing, last year he got into 3D heli flying and has constantly stated helis are far harder to fly, perform 3d on and master. Each to their own I have tons to learn on both in maneuvers but planks are for those days you want to relax. I enjoy then to but truth is they are much easier to fly basic and 3D.

...Once upon a time there were Nitros, flybars and frequency pins...

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01-10-2011 09:53 PM  7 years agoPost 18
heli-cuzz

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Pittston, Pa. USA

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Well put!!!
I still see planker pilots who've been flying for years bouncing airplanes down the runway, not compensating for prop torque and letting the airplane yaw into the flight path of the pits, people diving for cover etc...
+1

Sounds like you've been at my club.
I've had atleast a 1/2 dozen instances where I would get into the which way do I dive stance.

Fury 55 NIB Furion6 CGY750 fbl helicopter-Frenzy CGY750 fbl nitro-Frenzy fbl NOBAR90

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01-10-2011 10:05 PM  7 years agoPost 19
kcgraves

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rochester, ny - USA

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It took me two years of occasional trying, and three destroyed trainers, to get the landing down. I could fly it, loop, roll, etc. almost immediately. Now that I can do it I just fly a PZ T-28 foamy and a UM PZ T-28. But not so much as someone else said, they are boring.

Like others have said, I watch plankers who have been flying for years land and take off and I cringe. Especially when they dump a $1000 plane or bounce it down the runway and the gear breaks off or it noses in.

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01-10-2011 10:14 PM  7 years agoPost 20
Cowjock

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Pa.

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Well put!!!
I still see planker pilots who've beenflying for years bouncing airplanes down the runway, not compensating for prop torque and letting the airplane yaw into the flight path of the pits, people diving for cover etc...
Been there, have seen that more than once.

In the one club I do belong to we kinda have a unwritten rule(between the heli pilots) That is:Never turn your back to the flight line if there is a plank in the air or on the field.

Damn that ground is hard! When's the right time to get out of this money sucking hobby?

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HelicopterMain Discussion › Not all airplane pilots can fly helis. But can all heli pilots fly planks?
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