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HelicopterTools and Field Equipment › Soldering Gun for Deans
01-02-2011 06:37 PM  6 years agoPost 41
AirWolfRC

rrProfessor

42½ N, 83½ W

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My main soldering tool is a no longer available Radio Shack special that is a 3 piece arrangement. A pencil style holder, a screw in heating element with a small light bulb thread and a screw on soldering tip. The heating element came in 3 heats, I use the 37W. Multiple tips were available and I use the 1/8" spade tip. There has been very little that I can't solder with that unit. It has served me well over the past 30 years. (I have replaced the heating element and tip a few times over the years)

The closest thing RS currently has to it is 64-2071 but it's not quite as good.

Yes, I also have 2 Weller temperature controlled stations but they are not as convenient as the RS unit. I also have two different vacuum pump driven soldering units, great for removing solder.

But my $30 RS unit does 98% of my work.

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01-02-2011 06:47 PM  6 years agoPost 42
Gehrbox

rrApprentice

Charleston,SC

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I've been using a Weller 40 watt soldering iron for deans without any problems.

Its the technique used that makes the difference.

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01-02-2011 07:30 PM  6 years agoPost 43
Al Austria

rrElite Veteran

Gainesville, FL

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Weller 40 watt iron here as well, have used it to solder plenty of 8ga battery leads to Dean's. You must be sure that you are using the appropriate tip on your iron. A small "pencil" type tip that you would use on a PCB doesn't have enough thermal mass to solder an 8ga wire. And like everyone here has said, you cannot replace the proper technique.

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01-02-2011 07:31 PM  6 years agoPost 44
what_the_helli

rrKey Veteran

cookeville, tn USA

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Technique?
No real skill needed with a good iron. So easy even I can do it

1. Tin deans
put flux on deans
touch solder to iron---less than a second
touch iron to deans---less than a second

2. Tin wire
put flux on wire
hold solder to wire
touch iron to wire--feed it solder---less than a second

3. Attach the wire to deans
hold wire on deans
touch with soldering iron---maybe a second

I put the fun in dysFUNctional :)
Team KBDD & Funding by TnPrintMasters.com

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01-02-2011 07:38 PM  6 years agoPost 45
Al Austria

rrElite Veteran

Gainesville, FL

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Technique?
No real skill needed with a good iron. So easy even I can do it

1. Tin deans
put flux on deans
touch solder to iron---less than a second
touch iron to deans---less than a second

2. Tin wire
put flux on wire
hold solder to wire
touch iron to wire--feed it solder---less than a second

3. Attach the wire to deans
hold wire on deans
touch with soldering iron---maybe a second
The correct method and technique go hand in hand. You'd be surprised as to what people do when they try soldering for the first time...

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01-02-2011 07:40 PM  6 years agoPost 46
AltecLansing

rrElite Veteran

North Carolina

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I find patience helps also.

Man, I miss the eighties.

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01-02-2011 07:57 PM  6 years agoPost 47
what_the_helli

rrKey Veteran

cookeville, tn USA

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You'd be surprised as to what people do when they try soldering for the first time...
Ahh yes, the first time.... no help, no guidance, no flux, no success, I remember it well.....LOL (hold wire on deans with my hand, put solder on wire, mash it all with a cheap iron with a pencil tip. Hold for 1 maybe 2 min. Melt the deans, burn my fingers and still the wire wouldn't stick, or just barely. But the deans was no longer good. So grab another deans try again and again....call a friend and say---HELP!!!!! ) I laugh now but was pissed then....

I put the fun in dysFUNctional :)
Team KBDD & Funding by TnPrintMasters.com

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01-02-2011 08:52 PM  6 years agoPost 48
JasonJ

rrKey Veteran

North Idaho

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I have the gun that the OP posted, and have soldered countless deans and other stuff as well. I am trying to figure out this damage the electronics as soon as you pull the trigger nonsense. You shouldn't have the tip on anything when you pull the trigger. Once the trigger is pulled, it's just another hot ass soldering iron. I don't know how anyone else is doing it but I let the thing get up to temperature before trying to solder. The whole point of the gun is for it to get up to temp quickly. Once up to temp THEN I touch it to whatever it is I am trying to solder. It heats it fast enough so the solder flows fast so you don't have as much heat creeping up the wire into the component.

Or you can sit there holding an iron to it waiting and waiting for it to heat enough, all the while the heat is creeping into the electronics. Ultimately, the end result is the same, you just didn't spend all day doing it. I used an iron before the gun, and I'll never do it again. I have not had a single bit of electronics damaged by using the gun. I can't say for sure how circuit boards are assembled, but I am fairly sure it isn't done with a low wattage iron. Those Chinese girls don't have all day....

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01-02-2011 09:06 PM  6 years agoPost 49
Gehrbox

rrApprentice

Charleston,SC

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Technique?
No real skill needed with a good iron. So easy even I can do it

1. Tin deans
put flux on deans
touch solder to iron---less than a second
touch iron to deans---less than a second

2. Tin wire
put flux on wire
hold solder to wire
touch iron to wire--feed it solder---less than a second

3. Attach the wire to deans
hold wire on deans
touch with soldering iron---maybe a second
That's the same technique I was referring to.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technique

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01-02-2011 09:42 PM  6 years agoPost 50
tadawson

rrElite Veteran

Lewisville, TX

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Other than the lack of need for external flux if using decent rosin core solder, this is the same technique I have used for years. I have also been doing electronics/electrical soldering for over 40 years, and have yet to find a need for an external flux on anything electrical . . . the only time I have needed extra flux is soldering copper water pipe!

- Tim

Friends don't let friends become electrotarded . . . .

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01-03-2011 07:32 AM  6 years agoPost 51
lazor 22

rrApprentice

Wendell, NC

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I have the basic Weller wall plug IRON from Lowes, $14 works great on Deans, Mini Deans, Deans 3-Pin, Micro Deans, etc...

Also have some basic solder from Radioshack, and the tinning flux from Lowes (this works wonders on deans).

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01-03-2011 05:13 PM  6 years agoPost 52
w8qz

rrVeteran

Grand Rapids, MI -​USA

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I've used one of those Weller guns for around 40 years - they're great for larger soldering jobs, IMHO. (Actually, I think I'm on my 3rd one by now - they do wear out eventually) Dean's connectors, and similar joints to larger wires (as found on battery packs, ESCs, etc.) all can use a higher-wattage heat source. I've done a few LiPo pack repairs, and I'd recommend something like this for that purpose - you need to be able to make the LiPo tab joint flow relatively quickly, rather than letting internal parts heat up.
You can make your own tip for a weller, in a pinch, out of some #10 or #12 copper wire. Don't forget to loosen and retighten the tip nuts periodically, to refresh the tip 'joint'.
I agree with the previous posts - when you're dealing with potentially sensitive electronics, the switching of a solder gun CAN inject a spike into a circuit. I've killed a few things that way. To solder connectors on an ESC, for instance, discipline is required to only switch the gun on or off when NOT touching the leads.
I also agree, that for smaller work, circuit card stuff, etc. you really need a pencil-type iron, in the 20 - 30 W range.
I have a selection of soldering tools, to use depending on the task at hand.

"The helicopter is much easier to design than the aeroplane, but is worthless when done."

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01-03-2011 09:24 PM  6 years agoPost 53
Anthony.L

rrElite Veteran

Seattle, WA

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Bottom line, a soldering gun has no place in what we solder. A quality soldering iron, say from Weller, will get the job done in every instance. Granted you have the most critical component, some good old 60/40 solder. Good solder and a clean tip makes the world of a difference.

I personally use a Weller WSD51 soldering station.

http://www.cooperhandtools.com/bran...pc=037103191328

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01-03-2011 09:38 PM  6 years agoPost 54
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

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60/40 rosin core is good. 63/37 (eutectic) solder might is even easier to use for most.

I use Kester #44 63/37 (eutectic) rosin core solder.

  

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01-03-2011 09:38 PM  6 years agoPost 55
BeltFedBrowning

rrKey Veteran

Kansas City

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For having "no place" in our hobby, the Weller soldering gun works great for all my soldering jobs.

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01-03-2011 10:11 PM  6 years agoPost 56
JasonJ

rrKey Veteran

North Idaho

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Bottom line, a soldering gun has no place in what we solder
That's probably a little strong and broad of a statement. I agree that a misused gun is a bad thing, but when properly used it is fine at least for what I do. Also, my gun has two settings so it isn't all or nothing. I just haven't had a need for the cooler setting.

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01-03-2011 10:52 PM  6 years agoPost 57
Anthony.L

rrElite Veteran

Seattle, WA

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Sorry, that's probably a little blunt. However here is my fear. Someone new to hobby and soldering comes in this thread and sees people saying "I use a soldering gun with no issues". They say to themselves
oh I have one of those in the basement, so I'm good to go". They start soldering their new ESC and fry it.

Sure, any tool in experienced and trained hands will work. But what is best for new people learning to solder? Not a gun that can put WAY too much heat into what you are soldering if use improperly.

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01-03-2011 11:10 PM  6 years agoPost 58
JasonJ

rrKey Veteran

North Idaho

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That's true, and makes sense.

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01-04-2011 05:35 PM  6 years agoPost 59
luc manseau

rrNovice

New Liskeard,Canada

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just went and bought the Weller soldering gun , and im getting frustrated, getting the solder on the deans conector is easy but , that BIG A$$ wire "must be a 10 gauge" from my esc "CC 120 hv" just wont stick. is there a secret,or is the wire just to big for deans.

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01-04-2011 05:45 PM  6 years agoPost 60
Anthony.L

rrElite Veteran

Seattle, WA

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Wire is not too big for Deans. I've soldered 8ga on Deans before, and tons of 10ga.

You just need practice. Also if you fail, don't immediately try again. Give the deans and ESC time to cool down. If you overheat the Deans the metal can get loose inside the plastic and then you got a sloppy connector.

What solder are you using, that and properly tinning both the Deans and wire are the most critical parts. Also get a second pair of hands in either a clamp or a buddy. It will help a lot.

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