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HelicopterRadio - Spektrum DSM › 2.4 Conversion?
12-30-2010 10:06 AM  6 years agoPost 1
3djam

rrApprentice

UK

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Hi All,

I'm returning to helis after a break of several years and I'm trying to get up to speed with all the technical advances since I last flew my heli.

I have a JR 3810 tx which I'm thinking of converting to 2.4GHz wih a module. I have done some research on RR to establish the advantages. However, I've picked up that my tx's performance may drop if I convert it to 2.4? I have fairly high spec JR digital servos (8900G, 8411, 8231) on my heli and I wouldn't want to lose performance.

I would be very grateful for a simple explanation of the pros and cons of using a module conversion for the JR 3810. How reliable/successful is the module conversion? Or would I just be better to bite the bullet and pay up for a completely new radio set? I do like my 3810 though, so what would be the JR modern equivalent?

Again, I've been away from the hobby for several years and this 2.4 stuff is all new to me!

Very many thanks in advance.

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12-31-2010 02:38 AM  6 years agoPost 2
Windspiel

rrVeteran

Massachusetts

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I recently did it on 8103 there was no proformance drop at all
here is a link were i purchased mine with some more info
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...idProduct=14349

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12-31-2010 07:06 PM  6 years agoPost 3
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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There will be no change in performance of the radio after installing the Spektrum Airmodule. The only real "disadvantage" you'll see with using the Airmodule system vs just buying a new radio is that you will not be able to see the benefits of Spektrum's "Model Match" technology. That simply means that you can fire up your radio with the wrong model selected and not find out about it till it's too late. But since you already have an 8103, you know about that possibility anyway.

The reliability is good, just make sure the module fits properly and that your antenna connections on the TX are sound after the mod.

The closest radio to your 8103/3810 in the JR lineup these days is the 9503.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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01-04-2011 07:15 PM  6 years agoPost 4
3djam

rrApprentice

UK

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Hi,

Many thanks for your replies.

Do I need to use a 6V receiver battery, regulated to 4.8V? I have these servos in my heli:

Tail Servo - JRDS8900G
Collective Servo - JRDS8411
Cyclic Servos - JRDS8231
Throttle Servo - JRDS811

What are the advantages of using a 6v battery regulated to 4.8v? If I do need to convert to 6V, what do I need to buy?

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01-04-2011 10:34 PM  6 years agoPost 5
Windspiel

rrVeteran

Massachusetts

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my FrSky receiver is rated up to 13v so you could use a 3 cell lipo if you want
But most servos are rated for 6v total
In my case I fly sailplanes now I use a 2cell lipo but i use a UBEC to drop it down to 5 or 6 volts in your case you would still need some sort of voltage regulator

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01-05-2011 02:20 AM  6 years agoPost 6
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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Advantage of 6V over 4.8 is faster servo speed and higher torque values out of the servos.

The down side is that many servos, especially tail rotor servos, are not rated for more than about 5.8 volts input.

So if you're going to run 6V, you need to insure that everything connected to the battery voltage can handle 6V (plus a bit more for a fully charged pack) without getting fried.

As for using a 6V battery regulated to 4.8 volts, perhaps the only advantage would be that you'd still have decent voltage should one of the cells in the pack short out. That would be true using a linear regulator, as those will generally regulate and maintain the designed output voltage until the input droops down to within a few tenths of the designed output voltage. IF the input droops below the minimum input value, the regulator will then simply pass whatever it sees at the input to the output.

A switched regulator, on the other hand, may be designed to simply shut down when the input voltage drops below a certain value.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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01-05-2011 07:07 PM  6 years agoPost 7
3djam

rrApprentice

UK

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Many thanks for the info.

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01-10-2011 03:25 PM  6 years agoPost 8
Santiago P

rrProfessor

South West, Ohio

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Do I need to use a 6V receiver battery, regulated to 4.8V? I have these servos in my heli:

Tail Servo - JRDS8900G
Collective Servo - JRDS8411
Cyclic Servos - JRDS8231
Throttle Servo - JRDS811

What are the advantages of using a 6v battery regulated to 4.8v? If I do need to convert to 6V, what do I need to buy?
Whatever you have been using successfuly to power your flightpack will continue to be safe and reliable with the Spektrum RX.

You may say that you gain speed and torque with the higher voltages, but is at the cost of servo life! I just got a letter from JR saying to power the 8900G with nothing more than a 4cell Nicad or Nimh pack.
Your JRDS8411 and JRDS8231 are Spec for 6V so you should be ok there.

I have used Spektrum modules on Futaba Radios for several years for over 400 flights with no issues. I only used AR7000 or better, always powered everything with a fat 4Cell Nimh for simplicity.

Modelmatch? Just pay attention to what you are doing, and always do your preflights.

Santiago

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