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Other › New Compass FBL-rotor head design Whoopie!
06-03-2010 01:38 PM  7 years agoPost 1
helinewby

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Orlando Florida

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Hello Guys,

Here the brand new FBL-Rotor Head which is in production right now. This new system does not require a separate usual used swashplate driver. Please check these drawings and tell us what you think all inputs are welcome and expected. The head will be delivered without the shown head button. This is the system that Sebastian is flying and shown in the last video he made. It is really precise and powerful.

Regards C.B. Frazier

i will try to post a vid of Sebastian flying the fbl 6HV

here you go! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmfW_heHDPA

here you go!

PHOTO]/fastphoto/44451/OnlineRotorhead01.jpg[/PHOTO]

Team TSA Models, Team YS, Team Spin Blades..

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06-03-2010 01:42 PM  7 years agoPost 2
Ronald Thomas

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Gainesville, Fl, USA

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I like the design, looks great!

Team MikadoUSA 480XXTreme, 550SX, 600SX, 700XXTreme, 800XXTreme!!

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06-03-2010 02:56 PM  7 years agoPost 3
maj

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united Kingdom

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I like it

MJ

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06-03-2010 04:46 PM  7 years agoPost 4
tussy

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Thailand

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Fantastic !!

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06-03-2010 05:23 PM  7 years agoPost 5
Al Austria

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Gainesville, FL

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Interesting. I'm guessing that since the pitch links can only articulate on a single axis, this head has no dampening(rigid).

If not, how do you combat spindle teeter?

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06-03-2010 05:45 PM  7 years agoPost 6
hornet dave

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Cedar Rapids, IA USA

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Teeter would cause a change in phasing. I wonder if it amounts to anything of significance?

I got a fever! The only prescription is MORE 6HV

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06-03-2010 06:37 PM  7 years agoPost 7
Al Austria

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Gainesville, FL

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Well, the way the pitch links are mounted to the blade grips, they will always follow the movement of the spindle, trying to maintain a perpendicular orientation.

Now if the spindle teeters, the pitch links will be resisted by the inner race of of the swashplate, and ultimately be subjected to a bending load.

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06-03-2010 07:30 PM  7 years agoPost 8
hornet dave

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Cedar Rapids, IA USA

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You would be correct except for the fact that it is my understanding that this head will NOT use a swashplate follower; hence the reason for the unique pitch links in the first place.

I got a fever! The only prescription is MORE 6HV

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06-03-2010 08:00 PM  7 years agoPost 9
QuantumPSI

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Atlanta, GA

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I think what Al is trying to say is that this design will create bending loads on the structure going into the blade grips. This is going to be present not only due to the teetering of the spindle but also from the swash itself. With both sources of the loads being present, I imagine that the bending load on the grips will work the metal and eventually cause it to break. I don't see this as a good idea to be frank. The phasing will not change due to the teetering of the spindle, however, it will put load on the swash ring as well as the grip structures. As the spindle teeters, the grip that is above the spindle horizon will attempt to retard the phasing. The opposite is true for the grip that is below the horizon. Consequently, these two will obvious cancel, however, a LOAD IS CREATED and not only that, on each individual grip, the load is going to switch directions with each rotation. I don't know what the materials will be, but if it's metal, I see this system failing in a matter of time, just like taking a paper clip and working it back and forth until it snaps. The only away to avoid the stress from the spindle teetering is to have a rigid head with no dampening (which raises other issues).

All things considered, I'd rather have the swash driver.

...now where was I, dh/dt = BS-dx/dt
I will fly you forever... till earth do us part

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06-03-2010 08:11 PM  7 years agoPost 10
Al Austria

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Gainesville, FL

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As the spindle teeters, the grip that is above the spindle horizon will attempt to retard the phasing. The opposite is true for the grip that is below the horizon. Consequently, these two will obvious cancel, however, a LOAD IS CREATED and not only that, on each individual grip, the load is going to switch directions with each rotation.
Precisely

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06-03-2010 08:38 PM  7 years agoPost 11
maj

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united Kingdom

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Damn you guys are clever but it makes sense

MJ

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06-03-2010 11:00 PM  7 years agoPost 12
TheBum

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McKinney, TX

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Won't the ball links on the bottom of the linkages absorb most of those loads by twisting on the swash balls? The amount of load at the top of the linkages would be dependent on the tightness of the ball links on the bottom.

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06-04-2010 01:18 AM  7 years agoPost 13
MrRPM

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Lancaster, OH - USA

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Mmm, food for thought... I really think it should be fine. Of course long term testing with a few hundred flights plus should show any slop/fatigue signs/failure. Some of the pilots have been testing a while; a couple of them tend to rack up the flight count pretty quick.

As far as the cyclic load... it would bend one way then the other half a turn later, right. If you use very firm dampers, the majority of the teetering will be negligible, as the carbon shrouded links will still flex a bit. I would think slop would develop before metal fatigue would be the concern.

I do think it is innovative and a great idea... it will be a good design if it holds up for hundreds of hard 3D flights. Even if you choose to replace the links and ball screws every 200 flights for peace of mind, that would probably be easy and affordable.

Caleb White -- Compass Model - KBDD - MKS - BeastX

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06-04-2010 03:01 AM  7 years agoPost 14
hornet dave

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Cedar Rapids, IA USA

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DOH! yep I was wrong, both the links bend in the same direction in response to a teeter.

But of course all things considered I'd just rather have a flybar

I got a fever! The only prescription is MORE 6HV

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06-04-2010 11:48 PM  7 years agoPost 15
RAK402

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Alhambra, CA

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I have not flown flybarless since the 1980's, but this design looks very good to me.

Team KBDD/Compass Team Manger/Experience RC/Team JR Americas/WR Field Rep

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06-05-2010 02:27 AM  7 years agoPost 16
QuantumPSI

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Atlanta, GA

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I understand your point MrRPM and I actually think you could be right depending on the materials used. However, my concern isn't for the links themselves but rather where those links mount on the grips. Those dowels coming out of the grips are going to be the parts that will be experiencing the bending loads. My concern is the material right after the grip holes that is going to be "worked" back and forth. I am not concerned about the links at all actually.

...now where was I, dh/dt = BS-dx/dt
I will fly you forever... till earth do us part

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06-06-2010 04:35 AM  7 years agoPost 17
MrRPM

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Lancaster, OH - USA

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Sure, I know what you are saying. I have not looked closely at a test unit yet and have not heard exactly what they are using for that stud/sleeve, but it is true that the smallest cross-section at the control arm will take the most stress. Someone could work out a complex computer model, but most likely would not yield real enough data. I think what you are waiting for is testing, testing, testing... which will show its longevity. I'm hoping for the best!

... also, just think about all the other little potential failures you can have on any given model... it sure is amazing to look at this little screw or that fragile part and it is mind-blowing how much abuse we can dish out on these machines and they [usually] don't explode!

Caleb White -- Compass Model - KBDD - MKS - BeastX

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06-06-2010 05:46 AM  7 years agoPost 18
QuantumPSI

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Atlanta, GA

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it is mind-blowing how much abuse we can dish out on these machines and they [usually] don't explode!
Had to laugh at this, but you're right. We need to see testing. At first glance, I don't too much care for it, however, if it can handle hundreds of flights without problems, then it's an excellent idea. Still, I'd replace those particular parts after every crash, even if they appear to be perfectly fine.

...now where was I, dh/dt = BS-dx/dt
I will fly you forever... till earth do us part

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06-08-2010 03:28 PM  7 years agoPost 19
petmotel

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DeKalb, IL.

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As the spindle teeters, the grip that is above the spindle horizon will attempt to retard the phasing. The opposite is true for the grip that is below the horizon. Consequently, these two will obvious cancel, however, a LOAD IS CREATED and not only that, on each individual grip, the load is going to switch directions with each rotation.
How is it that a bending load would be created? The ends of the link arms attach to the swash plate and are the ONLY things that radially locate the upper/inner portion of the swash. As the spindle teeters, the ends of the link arms move in unison one forward of a 90 degree angle, one less. This would cause the swash to rotate in a slightly less than perfectly constant rotational speed. I don't see a force that would cause a significant bending load on the link rods caused by head dampening?

Edit: Looked at the pics again, and I do see that as the link ends move they would cause a bending load. They actually move the center axis in the same direction, and obviously the swash is unable to follow, so a load would be created. Interesting, I wonder how much the spindle actually tilts in flight?

Jay

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06-08-2010 08:06 PM  7 years agoPost 20
Al Austria

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Gainesville, FL

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Ok, to prevent any further confusion as to what spindle vs pitch link motions are in question, study this picture. The red arrows illustrate the movements of each respective component if the spindle were to teeter CW as shown.

Now ponder what loads exist when the two pitch links are attatched to the inner race of a swashplate.

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