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HelicopterMain Discussion › Old-Timers Who Started with a 30 Size Nitro...
12-30-2009 01:37 PM  7 years agoPost 21
Avropilot

rrVeteran

Murfreesboro, Tennessee

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30 size Kalt Enforcer ZR for me with a webber 30 red head motor. A 30 size Raptor is a great beginner heli, I would recommend it to anyone. One of our guys has one I set up for him. I've had it inverted doing funnels etc.. However it can be outgrown and then another heli purchase is needed.

Waiting for parts

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12-30-2009 01:44 PM  7 years agoPost 22
JeepCJ

rrKey Veteran

Pennellville NY (Syracuse Heli Group)

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remember making tuned pipes from those hairspray cans? I think it was Mouse or something like that...

Bob

Team Synergy/ Team Scorpion

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12-30-2009 01:59 PM  7 years agoPost 23
bobbyhill4x4

rrApprentice

Watertown NY

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I start with a 30 size helicopter, which I found to be more stable then the 450 at that time and a lot cheaper to repair. I would say that the 30 are a better starter helicopter if you plan to move to larger nitro.

Rob

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12-30-2009 02:09 PM  7 years agoPost 24
RayJayJohnsonJr

rrKey Veteran

Midwest

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Yeah, started with a 30. I think it all worked out ok. I've flown some of the smaller twitchier electrics, and I think the 30 was a better choice. Not so much because of the nitro vs electric thing, but because of the size.

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12-30-2009 04:06 PM  7 years agoPost 25
Hughes500Pilot

rrKey Veteran

Anaheim, CA

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I started with a Kalt Baron 30MX back in 1985 (the metal frame Baron, not the later Baron with the all plastic frame). Even though it was my first heli, it was very stable - easy to fly. The bigger it is, the more mass it has, the harder it is for the wind to kick it around.

I think had I started on a 450 electric, it would have been too twitchy ffor me to "really learn" and I would have given up helis and just stuck with airplanes.

If I could do it all over again, I would start off with a 50 size glow heli. -Steve

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12-30-2009 04:10 PM  7 years agoPost 26
ErichF

rrElite Veteran

Sutton, NH

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I think the 30-50 nitro or electric birds are the "proper" training machines. The smaller electrics and associated toys are great hooks for the hobby, but hardly proper introduction and training equipment.

The area where I see folks go wrong is first, they buy a Blade mSR or mCX or some such, which is a great way to get into the hobby and see what it *might* be like. Where they go wrong is their choice in a second, real training machine. They get something just a hint bigger than the mCX, like a twitchy 400 size clone or whatever. They also force themselves to fly in confined areas like their front or back yards, alone.

There's more people trying RC helis these days, but at the same time, they are going about it in ways that are a lot harder, more frustrating, and ultimately more expensive. I think a contributing factor is that many new folks have no interest in listening to those of us that have been there, done that. They'd rather do whatever the internet or LHS car guys say he should do, instead.

Erich

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12-30-2009 04:13 PM  7 years agoPost 27
Hughes500Pilot

rrKey Veteran

Anaheim, CA

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contributing factor is that many new folks have no interest in listening to those of us that have been there, done that.
So Very, Very True!!!

I've tried and tried to tell people not to start off with a "toy" heli or a twitchy 450... But they dont listen...

Then, after months of crashes and LOTS AND LOTS of money later, I let them fly my Shuttle ZXX on a buddy box and their jaw just drops at how easy it is... Then I explain this is a 20 year old heli that can be found dirt cheap everywhere (with good parts support too). Then they feel like idiots...

-Steve

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12-30-2009 04:48 PM  7 years agoPost 28
Busher

rrKey Veteran

Manchester, England

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Started with a nexus 30 and then moved to a raptor 30, these 2 heli's were great for learning on, and I still like the raptor 30.

Good luck
Busher

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12-30-2009 04:50 PM  7 years agoPost 29
LonR

rrElite Veteran

Macomb,Mi

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Well im not a old timer but I started the hobby February of 2008 with a 450 size heli.I started doing alot of reading on the bigger helis,took advice from alot of guys here and ended up trading my 450 for a RTF Raptor 30.I learned sooo much more and sooo much faster with the Rappy 30 its crazy.I really wish I started off with a 30 size heli because its alot easyer to learn to fly,stable is the key.I crashed alot more and it cost me alot more to fly the 450 size helis,the Raptor 30 was alot cheaper to learn with.I think every noob should start with a 30 size heli.I went from noob to wild in less than 1 1/2 years.This was the first flight with my Raptor 30 (June 16,2008) and the Trex 600 (October 26,2009) is where im at thanks to the Rappy 30 .

Watch at YouTube

Watch at YouTube

I know if I stuck with the Trex 450 I would be around sport flying and still crashing alot.

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12-30-2009 07:35 PM  7 years agoPost 30
twguns

rrVeteran

Indianapolis, IN

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No electrics, 250's or 450's in 1976!

American RC Revolution, I believe something in the .40 size motor. K&B as I recall. Fixed pitch, no gyro.

Good size to start with IMO, but not without collective or a good modern gyro.

bigTim

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12-30-2009 07:45 PM  7 years agoPost 31
ddracer

rrNovice

lowestoft

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I started with a MFA Sport 500 in 1987 It was shocking funny enough I still have it. I have had electrics Hurican 550 T-Rex 600 and a few 450 but now fly only "Smoke and Slime" Rappys.

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12-30-2009 07:48 PM  7 years agoPost 32
ddierking

rrApprentice

St Charles, MO - USA

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I started with Kysho Nexus 30, then a Century hawk and a raptor 30. I like my nitro birds much more that the little electrics. I seem to crash more with the little electrics, haha.

Dan the Man
"I change helicopters almost as often as I change my underwear"

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12-30-2009 07:48 PM  7 years agoPost 33
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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I believe the Revolution was introduced in 1976, not 1975. And it was for a 40-sized motor.

But electrics were not an option when I started, nor were 30-powered helis. I learned to tune motors in my control-line and RC plank days, so starting up with a nitro motor was not a real problem.

After a lot of fooling around with a DuBro Whirlybird, the Superbird conversion, a Revolution 40, partially building a Kavan Jet-Ranger (then abandoning it after realizing I didn't know how to fly it and that nice fiberglass scale fuselage was just asking for a big crash), my first successful heli was a 60-powered Schluter HelibBoy.

My first "small" heli was a Mini Boy with an HP Gold Cup 40, later replaced with an OS 45 FSR.

I've owned and flown quite a few 30 sized ships since then -- Concept 30, Nexus 30, Caliber 30 and a Caliber 4, I find there really is nothing wrong with flying them, OR having them as a first heli. They fly well, are economical to operate AND maintain, and teach you to manage power and collective, something you may not necessarily learn with a heli that has a tremendous power-to-weight ratio.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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12-30-2009 07:56 PM  7 years agoPost 34
teamdavey2001

rrApprentice

Sunnyvale, California, USA

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Damn kids - I started on a Micro Mold Lark. HB 28, no gyro and fixed pitch - now that's learning........

No - I wouldn't do it that way again.

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12-30-2009 08:24 PM  7 years agoPost 35
gologo

rrKey Veteran

Sedalia, Mo USA

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About the same here; fixed pitch and no gyro......GMP Rebel, 50OS w.
heliball muffler!

Few months later, went to a Shuttle ZX and never looked back.

Believe the main thing the Rebel did was to just light the 'FIRE'

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12-30-2009 08:30 PM  7 years agoPost 36
JayL

rrVeteran

Leesburg GA

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I started with a century hawk 3 and learned alot. I think with a 30 I learned collective management but with the power we have now it doesnt matter much.

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12-30-2009 09:12 PM  7 years agoPost 37
jackheli

rrProfessor

Vancouver - Canada

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Nexus 30 here. What a drag...

It's easy to find an excuse to do wrong. Hard is not to find an excuse to do right.

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12-30-2009 10:24 PM  7 years agoPost 38
Dilbeck

rrElite Veteran

Springdale Arkansas

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I am close. started out with a blade cx2 and thought, that was easy. Got a Hawk pro with a OS37 and thought, now thats what im talking about. Then for some strange reason, I purchased a Blade 400 electric thinking it would be better for the back yard. All I can say to that is dont do it! EVER, It was an unstable picnic table. Worst $500 I ever spent. The only reason I have it is because I could not wish this thing on anybody and still sleep at night!! I think I have 6 flights on it and 8 crashes. I personally think everyone should get a chance to fly a 30 size first against anything smaller. The outcome would be some brands would disappear all together. Some brands make their living off the backs of unsuspecting new fliers just getting into the hobby.

Clint

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12-30-2009 10:43 PM  7 years agoPost 39
ShuRugal

rrKey Veteran

Killeen, TX

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I got a great deal on a nexus 30 and was surprised how stable it is. I think it is a awesome trainer, besides the unavailability of parts, it does everything slow, and easy to see, and can handle some wind.
+1 on that. I absolutely love my Nexus, makes me look like i actually know what the hell i'm doing. ;p

AMA 700159

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12-30-2009 10:48 PM  7 years agoPost 40
drdot

rrElite Veteran

So. California, Orange County.

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fwiw..

Hard to beat a Raptor 30 for training...I fly all electric, but the learning curve is, I believe, still a bit steeper than nitro...No question that people i've helped over the years have learned faster with a larger, more stable heli.
Here's a thought...Many people have vision less than optimal...Doesn't, matter in everyday life, but if you are learning on a 450 size heli, have an orientation problem, let it get downwind....Gets small in a heartbeat....

30 Raptor, buddy box, OS37 (Or the TT39, which is a very good engine) and you can't go wrong. Be sure to get help with engine tuning, which is different on helis than planes.
If you are just starting out, your most important initial purchase is a flight simulator.

Good Luck!

John.

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