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12-28-2009 11:44 PM  7 years agoPost 1
xfc3dcd

rrApprentice

West Carrollton, Ohio usa

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For those who fly in extreme cold, has your gas engine ever leaned out and quit due to carb icing? If so, did you find a solution?

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12-29-2009 12:13 AM  7 years agoPost 2
rbort

rrProfessor

Franklin, MA - USA

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Never been verified

I had a Hobbico Biplane once that had an OS 91 4 cycle. I fired it up and that guy always ran like a top. I went full throttle and took off, and while in a 45 degree climb the engine just shut off like you killed the ignition, but those things don't have ignition.

This was years ago and for lack of any better explanation, I blamed it on carburetor icing. Unfortunately for me I was flying from a soccer field, and I got caught in a bad attitude heading out of the field I made a bad landing downwind and damaged the plane beyond flable that day.

That's as close as I came to that, but it was only a theory shot in the dark sort of thing.

I did however, experience wing icing with my Decathlon flying is foggy cold conditions. I was on skis, temps were around freezing, and while flying OK after several minutes the plane stalled early in flight (at a higher speed than expected) and I powered up and recovered. Had to make a high speed landing and something felt "fishy" and when I went to pick it up it weighted a TON! WTF? The bottom of the wing was a sheet of ice, wow! Had to take it back home as it wasn't coming off easily and I didn't want to damage the wing trying to do it. Just brought it home and let it melt off on its own.

Now that was an interesting thing, only happened to me once...

-=>Raja.

MA 1005 Hanson 280, 4142 flts
Spectra 27 3DMax, 3210 flts
Whiplash V1 Hanson 300, 1440 flts
Whiplash V2 Hanson 300, 207 flts

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12-29-2009 12:40 AM  7 years agoPost 3
Helizrule

rrVeteran

Lake Ariel, PA

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I have had it once flying a .40 size airplane off a frozen lake. The engine quit and when it landed the carb was full of ice. This is the only time I have ever seen it but it does occur. Just like Raja, the conditions were foggy and cold (visible moisture)type conditions.

What we really need is a fuel injection system for the Zenoah's. Ideally hooked to something similar to a carb smart to adjust mixture to maintain proper engine temps.

One mile of road will take you one mile. One mile of runway will take you anywhere in the world.

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12-29-2009 01:56 AM  7 years agoPost 4
crash n' burn99

rrApprentice

ottawa, canada

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hey Helirulz you may be on to something, I wonder if the carbsmart would be a good idea for the g20.

Do proctologists chew there finger nails when there nervouse?

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12-29-2009 03:25 AM  7 years agoPost 5
rotaryfalcon

rrApprentice

S.E. USA

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Carb icing is more common in gasoline engines. If I remember correctly there is about a 30 degree F drop in the venturi due to evaporation, below ambeient temp. Humidity is a big player. High humidity and 62F is a perfect situation for carb ice. Glow motors are less likely to ice because of the lack of a real venturi. I learned to fly full scale in Fla and carb ice was common in the warmer temps as well as cold. If your engine leans in the cold, it may be due to a major temp shift since it was last flown. Colder denser air leans a carb.

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12-29-2009 02:21 PM  7 years agoPost 6
AceBird

rrElite Veteran

Utica, NY USA

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For those who fly in extreme cold, has your gas engine ever leaned out and quit due to carb icing? If so, did you find a solution?
It use to be done in an automobile by directing engine heat into the carb. A temperature controlled damper would prevent overheating.

You might be able to manually set a damper for the conditions of the day and get away with it.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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12-29-2009 03:16 PM  7 years agoPost 7
Chris Bergen

rrElite Veteran

cassopolis, MI USA

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Flying in the snow here in MI, I've had blades ice up before had any type of carb problem...

The lift just disappears...

Chris D. Bergen

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12-29-2009 04:26 PM  7 years agoPost 8
bwarkent

rrApprentice

Houston Tx

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"If I remember correctly there is about a 30 degree F drop in the venturi due to evaporation, below ambeient temp. Humidity is a big player. High humidity and 62F is a perfect situation for carb ice."

Very interesting. We had really bad fog here in Houston about two weeks ago with temps around 50-60F. It finally broke on Sunday and I rushed out to the field. Much to my dismay, the fog had returned by the time I reached the field. You could see the moisture. Since I hadn't flown in a while I decided to fly the 1005 (mainly close in flying). Flew great until I landed. I couldn't spool back up, it just bogged and died. Concerned that maybe I overheated the engine I stuck my finger on the crank case and held it there for 10 seconds - definitely not hot. Let others fly and then tried again - fired right up, flew great until I landed and then wouldn't spool up. Tried richening the low mixture a blade width - that made it worse, tried leaning it a blade width - no change. Also note that it would hover and spool up fine at the beginning of the flight.

Maybe I'm just not experienced like Raja at flying in COLD weather

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12-29-2009 10:16 PM  7 years agoPost 9
xfc3dcd

rrApprentice

West Carrollton, Ohio usa

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Thanks for the replies. I have some below 0 degree F. flying to do and was trying to cover the bases.

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12-31-2009 03:01 PM  7 years agoPost 10
Helizrule

rrVeteran

Lake Ariel, PA

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If you are in below zero weather, the air is probably too dry to cause carb. ice.

One mile of road will take you one mile. One mile of runway will take you anywhere in the world.

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12-31-2009 04:21 PM  7 years agoPost 11
pgkevet

rrKey Veteran

Wales

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Light aircraft pilots do have to worry about carb icing.. a standard stratedy approach and in my PPL days a common issue...not really a problem although my one encounter with Prop icing was pretty scary in zero viz in cloud and restricted flying areas.

I once encountered carb icing in my old car..something you don't expect.. but that was simply due to a leaky gasket on the manifold and the expanding escaping fuel mix iced the whole thing up! It took a while to find.. becasue it took a while to happen during which the engine warmed up under the hood and gave enough heat to melt it again and then car would run fine...found on the lucky fast look under hood when it stalled..

pgk

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