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HelicopterOff Topics › Tips on introducing a new dog
12-08-2008 11:14 PM  9 years agoPost 1
MX400 DUDE

rrApprentice

Oklahoma

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I need tips on introducing a new dog. I rescued a little beagle/dachshund mix because she was going to be put down this week if she wasn't adopted because her time had ran out, and I couldn't let that happen. She is a very sweet little pup but is a bit timid, I think she has been abused. Anyway I will be picking her up this weekend and I'm not quite sure how to introduce her to my little dog I have now. He is quite the alpha male and is not very receptive of other dogs and is very possessive of me. Any tips? Here is a pic of her

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12-08-2008 11:25 PM  9 years agoPost 2
Uplink Tom

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State College PA

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Quick version.
you need 2 people.

Have them both on a leash and introduce them on forign soil. A park, neighbors yard, on a sidewalk away from home.
Have them walk side by side quickly, no stopping to sniff, no leash tangles...
You want to make them a little tired.

After 10-15 min they should be used to each other, now head home to the house where they (should) go into the door together.

I was told this by a vet and it worked for me with 2 pound dogs I have.

There will be some pecking order fights later, but just let them fight. They'll figure it out.

Heli's just mock me then crash....

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12-08-2008 11:27 PM  9 years agoPost 3
easyrider1

rrNovice

motorhome

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my male german shephard is very much the "alpha male" and has not met a bitch he didn't like or atleast never met one he didn't want to connect with. poor guy is 12 1/2 years old now and has degenerative disc desease but i know if i put a female in the yard with him he would definately try his best to hit it.

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12-09-2008 01:23 AM  9 years agoPost 4
MX400 DUDE

rrApprentice

Oklahoma

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Quick version.
you need 2 people.

Have them both on a leash and introduce them on forign soil. A park, neighbors yard, on a sidewalk away from home.
Have them walk side by side quickly, no stopping to sniff, no leash tangles...
You want to make them a little tired.

After 10-15 min they should be used to each other, now head home to the house where they (should) go into the door together.

I was told this by a vet and it worked for me with 2 pound dogs I have.

There will be some pecking order fights later, but just let them fight. They'll figure it out.
I was thinking about introducing them somewhere foreign. That sounds like the best option that way my dog isn't trying to guard his turf. The main thing to me is to not tick off my old pup, had him for over 5 years now.

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12-09-2008 01:26 AM  9 years agoPost 5
OICU812

rrMaster

Edson, Alberta, Canada

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Some dogs simply will never get along, no matter what you do. You now have the small dog so give it a shot and see what gives, best of luck.

...Once upon a time there were Nitros, flybars and frequency pins...

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12-09-2008 01:31 AM  9 years agoPost 6
Heliramos

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south of the Caribbean

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big dogs always get respect from the little dogs.
its just a matter of time.

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12-09-2008 02:29 AM  9 years agoPost 7
rcsoar4fun

rrKey Veteran

Boise, Idaho

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I have done this before, foreign soil works best. Home soil is not a bad thing if the newcomer is timid. She how she reacts. If you approach her a little aggressively and she rolls on her back you are golden. Its very unusual for a dog to attack one that is obviously submissive.

Give the old dog copious amounts of attention. He will probably feel a bit like his world is being taken over, much less so if he is very confident that his people love him.

He *will* put her in her place at some time. Unless it is very violent, blood drawn, let it go. Yelping and crying is pretty normal. As long as she rolls over and/or crawls back things will be fine.

Things largely depend on the disposition of both dogs. Just remember to spoil the alpha dog. If he snaps at the new one and she yelps just let her be. In a few weeks all will be fine and you can reassure her. If you have a wife or daughter in the house he is very protective of be careful about letting the new dog get fawned over by them. Again, some dogs it won't matter, others are very particular.

A fair warning, Dachshunds are not prone to being submissive. Keeping her on a leash at first is not a bad idea.

I give up on Loctite, nothing lasts long enough to vibrate loose anymore.

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12-09-2008 04:57 AM  9 years agoPost 8
MX400 DUDE

rrApprentice

Oklahoma

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She does exactly like you said, if you approach her quickly she will roll over on her back. I'm probably worrying a little bit much, I'm sure my dog will be fine with her after a while but I know for a fact that he will feel violated for a few days.

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12-09-2008 05:02 AM  9 years agoPost 9
rcsoar4fun

rrKey Veteran

Boise, Idaho

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It sounds like she is good on doggy protocol, just keep him spoiled for a few days and all will be fine. Keep us updated.

I give up on Loctite, nothing lasts long enough to vibrate loose anymore.

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12-09-2008 05:08 AM  9 years agoPost 10
nojohnny101

rrElite Veteran

10 miles north of Cincy, OHIO

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hey
hope all goes well....

please report back and let us know how it turns out

Thanks
~Will-i-am~

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12-09-2008 05:13 AM  9 years agoPost 11
MX400 DUDE

rrApprentice

Oklahoma

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I will certainly keep you all updated and I will post some more pictures that will be clear when I get her home Sat. or Sun. She does get scared easily, but she doesn't seem to urinate when frightened which I am pleased about. Thanks for the tips guys.

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12-09-2008 10:09 AM  9 years agoPost 12
Arthur

rrApprentice

Wales. UK

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Well done mate. We have had three rescue dogs. Our last one which we have had for eleven years now, was quite aggresive with food. He had to soocialise with the other four dogs we had already, we fed him away from the others at first. He is a changed character now. However rescue dogs often come with some mental scars from their former owners. We had one that would instictively duck if you picked up quickly anything that looked like a stick. Also some phrases can trigger them. One of them would freeze if we said "move". We never said it sternly but it early always freaked him out.

Your little chum looks lovely and she is lucky to have you. Mr and Mrs Arf

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12-09-2008 03:49 PM  9 years agoPost 13
jgunpilot

rrKey Veteran

Pollock, LA

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I can understand your concern on this topic. Our male dog, J-Raxx, had the run of the place unitl we "rescued" a yellow lab male pup. As he grew, Scout, the lab, decided he was the alpha male. J-Raxx didn't want to let go of the crown. The two fought savagely over food and turf until the day Scout disappeared. And I mean fought as though they were going to kill each other - water hoses and pulling them apart didn't work.

If you can start them off on the proper foot, so much the better.

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12-11-2008 04:27 PM  9 years agoPost 14
Steeltoes

rrApprentice

Mankato MN

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HEY MX

You need to PM me on this I can help

AMA #913061

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12-11-2008 04:41 PM  9 years agoPost 15
kookboy

rrKey Veteran

Vancouver, BC

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introduce them on forign soil.
x2

Like Furious said too. Some dogs just will never get along no matter what you do.

Sis rescued this pup from a couple who fed her human food/burgers,crap for a long time and didn't exercise her at all. She was a fat piggy when they got her. She was also moody and depressed all the time. Didn't want to do squat except for eat and sleep. Both her achilles T'd had to have surgery on cause her ass end was too heavy. After a year, she's a completely different dog.

She lives in Whistler with my sis and bro in law's family. On 5-7 hr up/downhill mountain bike riding on agressive trails she keeps up no problem. She swims and chases after bears which is great for when my sis takes her baby for hikes/walks. Great dog to have in the forest.

Looks just like yours.

Have patience, feed your dog healthy food and make sure he/she gets tons of exercise. Good luck and congrats.

I like Ceasar's !

Family

After a long hike

Scruntchy

Girls love me

Baby guard dog

... But honey it was only $$$

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12-11-2008 06:56 PM  9 years agoPost 16
MX400 DUDE

rrApprentice

Oklahoma

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Wow kookboy, that pup does look just like mine but I think that dog is bigger. Steeltoes, I'll get with you, I remember you telling me how well trained your dogs are, isn't one of them deaf or something like that? I'm going to have a bit of trouble introducing the dogs on foreign soil because the new one is getting spayed tomorrow and I'm picking her up Saturday so the introduction outdoors will be brief because its cold outside and I don't want her to get cold, plus she will be sore. I'll figure out something.

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12-11-2008 07:42 PM  9 years agoPost 17
Brokenlink

rrElite Veteran

Oakdale

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They might just get along fine,sometimes the little dog will want to check out the bigger one.

Jamie Griffith

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12-15-2008 08:03 PM  8 years agoPost 18
MX400 DUDE

rrApprentice

Oklahoma

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So far so good guys. My old dog doesn't care for her much but that's alright. She keeps her distance from him and he does the same. I was sitting on the floor petting the new pup and my other dog was sitting across the room making eye contact with me and growling . You all have any leash training tips? My other dog is not leash trained because he walks beside me, won't even leave to chase a cat, and he loves to do that. She's a smart dog so I think training her will be easy.

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12-15-2008 11:46 PM  8 years agoPost 19
WJackson

rrElite Veteran

Smyrna, Delaware

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I highly reccommend Ceasar Milans techniques. I've raised ALOT of dogs but he showed me stuff I was blind to that should have been obvious, but wasnt. Our current "Shadow" is the best, most well behaved dog I've ever had and I credit that to using the "dog whispers" techniques!!.

RIP Roman
Bill Jackson
AlignUSA

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12-17-2008 05:17 PM  8 years agoPost 20
MX400 DUDE

rrApprentice

Oklahoma

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The new pup has a problem. She was spayed last Friday the 12th and I noticed a little lump inside her abdomen by where the incision is, at the time I didn't think anything about it. I figured it was just a little bit of swelling. Now the lump is quite a bit larger and she is not acting like she was. Won't eat, won't drink and is acting more calm than usual. Doesn't appear to be in pain but its worrying me enough that I'm taking her to the vet today. Any thoughts?

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