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HelicopterCAD - Engineering - Technical › What is the most used or best CAD engineering​Software
10-05-2007 12:12 AM  10 years agoPost 1
da_man

rrKey Veteran

Central NC

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I already know solid works very well and some autocad, but I would like to know what CAD program is the most used in bussiness and or the best for engineers?

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10-05-2007 12:46 AM  10 years agoPost 2
helical

rrApprentice

Bowling Green, KY

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You'll probably get many opinions. My company uses Pro/E. I like it fine but I have no other experience except AutoCAD.

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10-05-2007 01:51 AM  10 years agoPost 3
flyboy0413

rrApprentice

Brookfield, CT

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I use Pro/Engineer and CoCreate onespace modeling at work. Cocreate is definitely easier to use, but I find that Pro/E is a more powerful tool. It all depends on what you want to do. I think you can get a free version of cocreate from their website if you want to play around w/ it.

go to http://www.cocreate.com

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10-05-2007 04:08 AM  10 years agoPost 4
TMoore

rrMaster

Cookeville, TN

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Autocad is the predominant package used for most 2D work with Solidworks used for solid modeling. The majors, like ProE, Unigraphics, Catia and CADAM are used in corporate settings with large IT/IS departments and deep pockets to support these packages. The medical companies like Unigraphics(McAuto) because of its CAM side.

TM

Delayed Response Operator Not Engaged

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10-05-2007 03:02 PM  10 years agoPost 5
MikeSherman

rrVeteran

Franksville, WI

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My vote goes to SolidWorks. I've been using it since 1994 and really enjoy working with the software. I am a SolidWorks Certified Professional so I do know my way around the software pretty good.

I made an honest attempt at learing Pro-E to expand my job opportunities, but it just was not as intuitive as SW.

I've used AutoCad for 2D design work. Once you go 3D, you never WANT to go back to 2D!

-Mike

Team QuickUK Pilot
Team Heliproz

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10-06-2007 02:41 AM  10 years agoPost 6
StickManMD

rrNovice

Baltimore, Maryland​- USA

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All the files we get in from Architect's and Mechanical Engineers are Autocad and in 3d. All of the large jobs are requireing Building Information Modeling, which is a fancy term for smart 3d objects.

We use Autocad MEP and a 3d piping add on to produce the mechanical systems inside of a building before a construction worker sets foot on site. To say autocad doesnt do 3d is not accurate, it depends on what you want out of it.

Autocad is the clear leader in the construction industry, and is leading the way in BIM with their revvit product.

So like the others were saying, there is no in general "best product", however there are best products for specific applications. If you tell us what you want to accomplish it will help us to recoment the best software.

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10-06-2007 05:09 AM  10 years agoPost 7
Furious Predator

rrProfessor

Kitchener, Ontario,​Canada

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i have used:

Auto CAD
Mechanical Desktop
Solid Edge
Solid Works
Inventor
Unigraphics

there are many others, but i havn't used them...

i have found that Solid Edge, Solid Works, and Inventor are pretty popular for mechanical engineering.

i worked at a place that was just converting from Mechanical desktop to Unigraphics.

Unigraphics is a VERY good and capable program, but it is very difficult to learn. i find that Inventor/solid works, and solid edge are very user friendly.

Auto CAD is still used, but i think its more reserved for architecture. In my opinion, solid 3D programs are far superiour to a 2D based program for mechanical things.

i spend most of my time on Solid Works at the moment. im currently using it to model my spair YS91 engine for my 3rd year project.

i just have to finish modeling the carb/regulator assembly, and its finished

Shawn
Team Leisure-Tech
Team HelixRC

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10-11-2007 02:29 AM  10 years agoPost 8
RaptorEngineer

rrApprentice

Aguadilla, Puerto​Rico

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I use

Hi:
Actually I used Co-Create and Pro-E in my work. Pro-E its more powerfull and complex to learn. All depend what you want.

http://www.heliengineering.com

best wishes

http://www.camaraaerea.com

if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enought features yet"

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11-10-2007 10:01 AM  10 years agoPost 9
lordraptor1

rrNovice

armore oklahoma, usa​all the way

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i know team associated, team losi, traxxas and others all use solidworks. i had a chance to play around with solidwork and with no training whatsoever i found it extremely easy to use.

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11-10-2007 11:26 AM  10 years agoPost 10
Mike0251

rrVeteran

Hills of the Blue​Ridge VA

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My company currently uses Pro-Wildfire and SDRC Ideas which is now part of the Unigraphics family. I have over 50,000 hours with Ideas and find it to be the best out there for several reasons. Has an excellent DBM (database manager) built right in, an extensive CAM package, top notch FEM package, superb drafting package. It is a very fast and effective program to use. The assembly feature allows the user to use or not use constraints. It is not mandatory. I have used Catia, Pro-E, Inventor, Solidworks, Solidedge, A-cad, Cadam, and many years of drawing board in my career to date. Its a no brainer decision for what I like to use. What is unique with this program, you can design your layout as you go, part after part right in place or off to the side without having to build an assembly first. You can have as many parts on the screen at one time that you would like, designed in place, modify as you go, alter this or that, and them boom, create and assembly and add them all right in. I'm spoiled.

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11-10-2007 12:20 PM  10 years agoPost 11
hootowl

rrProfessor

Garnet Valley, Pa.

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I come from a CATIA background where you could build anything, anywhere in space with minimum forced hierarchy. I'm on SolidWorks now and sometimes can get a bit frustrated with the unrelenting order of things. Yes I know, it's required for model based architecture but I really miss being able to just build a solid without the discipline when I need to. You can create planes, points, lines curves, than you can delete anything without getting a message telling you everything else will get deleted because one was created from the other.

CATIA has standard analysis power that is unreal. Solidworks has a very rudimentary analysis function that is sometimes hard to interpret.

That's CATIA V4. CATIA V5 is now PC based. I have almost no experience with V5 but I believe it's similar in functionality, generally speaking, to Solidworks. BTW Dassault owns CATIA, Solidworks and I believe the Autocad engine. Correct me if I'm wrong.

The issues today still are cross platform compatibility. I would like to see more standardized data transferability between systems.

Next week I will be back on CATIA V4 and V5... working on the V-22 Osprey program

Wolves don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep

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12-15-2007 06:57 AM  9 years agoPost 12
Edwardn

rrNovice

USA, CA

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Hey Mike you should try SW 2008-it is killer!!!!
I have use many others and SW is defenetly the best. Yes it is required discipline, but how to design something and do not have everything in order. I work for company which is ES9200 certified and we have all in order.
BTW in SW if use blocks-you can design assembly in one sketch-no problem at all!!!

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12-15-2007 01:49 PM  9 years agoPost 13
hootowl

rrProfessor

Garnet Valley, Pa.

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Just recently started my new job. I'm back on Catia V4 and it sucks compared to the newer, cheaper PC based softwares out there today. Reason is it's been around to the point of being abandoned by Dassualt in lieu of CATIAV5 which is very similar to Solidworks. I guess you don't know what you have till you lose it. I will be getting a new PC worstation with CATIAV5 next to my new rs6000 that CATIAv4 runs on so I'll have the best of both worlds shortly.

Edward,

I went to the SolidWorks 2008 Rollout Seminar a couple of months ago. The new stuff looks great. It's getting more and more inuitive and the user interface is really coming along. I like being able to drag and drop sketches from inside other models directly onto your working model.

I just read in DE magazine that Mike Paine, the founding architect of ProE has come up with what they are calling the next major step in 3D modeling software. SpaceClaim 2007+

"SpaceClaim has no concept of history, just features, but these are not discretely stored operations. By using an inference engine, SpaceClaim allows you to select and edit features directly, when you choose, and it just works."

Here's the article. Looks pretty impressive.

http://www.deskeng.com/articles/aaagax.htm

Wolves don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep

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12-15-2007 01:57 PM  9 years agoPost 14
GyroFreak

rrProfessor

Orlando Florida​...28N 81W

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For home use I used TurboCad.

I think about the hereafter. I go somewhere to get something, then wonder what I'm here after ?

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12-15-2007 03:49 PM  9 years agoPost 15
Edwardn

rrNovice

USA, CA

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Hi Mike.
Thanks for the article. Read it all.
Seems like this new SpaceClaim 2007+ has the same (some of them) futures as SW 2008-pulling and moving, live section, part in assembly editing etc. And price seems really good (I don't really care-my employer should care about it LOL)
Any way, 3D cad modeling going forward really fast and I am afraid very soon world will not need any more engineering schools, just classes to learn operate CAD. I see it on daily basisnew people comming to apply for work and call them engineer and only one thing they know how to "pull" and "move"

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05-06-2008 07:30 PM  9 years agoPost 16
dhc8guru

rrApprentice

Fort Worth, Texas

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Nothing is more powerful than Catia V5 and once V6 comes out we may hit the pinacle of PC based Parametric solid modeling software.
Having used Pro-E and Autocad, Catia blows them both away. Autocad is not useful for any serious modeling.
At around $30k for a Catia license...I would go with Solidworks, then Pro-E. Pro E is difficult to use because it was adapted from a Unix based system into PC based, making things cumbersome to model.

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05-07-2008 08:03 AM  9 years agoPost 17
Pole

rrApprentice

Norway

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Solid Edge is sweeeet... can`t wait to get my hands on v.21 that is comming soon..

Synchronous Technology looks good

http://www.plm.automation.siemens.c...s/breakthrough/

Stay tuned fore more happy days

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05-14-2008 12:58 AM  9 years agoPost 18
jpendleton84

rrNovice

United States

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everyone has a favorite to use, but being a mechanical engineer and working in the industry I have found Unigraphics to be the most versatile out of all the alternatives. UG does anything you can think of and more, but it has a steep learning curve.

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05-17-2008 06:02 AM  9 years agoPost 19
Edwardn

rrNovice

USA, CA

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I agree-everybody has their own preferences in CAD software and most of the people based their prefernces on what they used to use.
As UG, I never use it-I always use SW and AutoCAD (just to create DWG or DXF files). When I was choosing which CAD to learn-I search web for about 4-6 month and found most popular is SW now in general engineering, ProE and Catia for aerospace, about UGS I found it is most stable CAD and it doesn't have crashing problems as other do. But since we are talking engineering and we are assuming engineer supplyed with right hardware there are just a few problems with performance. A year ago I convince my manager to buy me Precision 690 (full blown), I tweak it slightly (3 GB switch "on", page file is more then huge) and I don't have any problem even ones for all 12 month. Before that I used Precision M70 for more then year and had just ones a month some problems, nothing major.
Just curious, what UGS has and SW doesn't?

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06-09-2008 05:12 AM  9 years agoPost 20
Dr.Rivet

rrApprentice

Seattle, WA, USA

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CATIA V5 Hands Down!!!

I'm not a designer, but have to extract, manipulate and analyze parts from V5. Without any training I was able (and have been for 5 years now) to use it to full extent. Lately, analysis package tied to Generative Shape Design became very powerful and I do all my FEM surface meshing in V5 as well. SolidWorks is just a small brother of V5 which was acquired by Dassault Systems before they developed V5.

On the other hand I hate and can't do anything in V4 on RS6000 running AIX.

Pro/E is ok, but their stupid hierarchy menu structure and excessive dependence on Father-Child association make it counter productive. In reality you just want the job done fast instead of thinking how to make the model universally parametric so any modification would be possible with minimum time loss, which is never the case.

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