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HelicopterCAD - Engineering - Technical › Drilling Hardened Steel
09-10-2007 06:26 PM  10 years agoPost 1
IYKIST

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London united​kingdom

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Are there any special drill bits for drilling hardened shafts.

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09-10-2007 06:44 PM  10 years agoPost 2
hootowl

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Garnet Valley, Pa.

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Solid carbide... short drill, slow.

Wolves don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep

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09-11-2007 10:14 AM  10 years agoPost 3
Chook

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Esperance Western​Australia

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Just buy the cheap masonary drills in the size you require.
Reshape the tip with a grinder (very slowly and don't overheat the insert) to the same relief angle as steel bits. They are negative angles from new.
Drill very slowly with a LOT of pressure and cutting fluid/compound and these will even drill out a broken "easy-out" or thread taps.
Works a treat. Cheers.

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09-11-2007 04:03 PM  10 years agoPost 4
jester4

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Brampton, Ontario

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What size do you want to drill? Drilling with good solid pressure is correct, but slowly is not. A rigid set-up is key. A carbide drill is VERY brittle but hard, so be careful when drilling especially when using a hand drill, try not to move too much. Carbide does NOT like low SFM (surface feet per minute), so you pretty much have to run the drill to max if you are drilling with a small drill. If you are looking to put a hole through a shaft (small shaft), then you have to use an endmill in a rigid set-up like a milling machine preferably.

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09-17-2007 09:06 PM  10 years agoPost 5
Hydroman

rrApprentice

Kommifornia

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nitrided coated titanium bit (def bling factor )
cobalt
poss stainless

all depends on how hard the metal is...

how many and what size do you need to drill?

its always best to start off small, then increase in size, if the hole you are trying to drill is of any size....

to maintain the edge of your drill bit, it must be harder (on say the rockwell scale), than the material that your going to drill.

The older I get, the better I was

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03-07-2008 08:54 AM  9 years agoPost 6
jpleth

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Palmdale, Ca

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Try anealing the part. Be careful not to warp the shaft.

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06-06-2008 02:26 AM  9 years agoPost 7
cforcht

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Chelsea in BFE Iowa

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typically you have to be 20 points higher on the rockwell C scale to machine one thing with another, depending how hard your shaft is you could try a solid carbide drill as mentioned earlier. go slow. keep it cool. and a mason bit is definitely not the way to go. it is carbide but doesnt use the right grade for drilling metal.



[b]heli flyer by day, custom making cnc heli parts by night[/b]

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06-06-2008 04:10 AM  9 years agoPost 8
kc8qpu

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sc

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find someone with a cnc mill. trust me its worth it and no headaches.

Carpe Diem!!!

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06-07-2008 02:18 AM  9 years agoPost 9
stickyfox

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Rochester, NY - US

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You don't need a cnc mill to drill a hardened shaft. Not unless you're drilling forty holes and you need them all exactly 0.1482 inches apart. A plain old mill will work. Even a drill press will do the trick.

(However, there's a good chance that your "somebody with a cnc mill" will know enough about machining to do what you want, so it's not an entirely bad suggestion.)

The tool is the important part. There are a lot of good suggestions here. Depending on the diameter involved you will probably need a centering bit and a cobalt or carbide drill, although nitride is hard enough and will probably last long enough to do the job. You might also consider scuffing the shaft where you want to drill it to get under the surface.

-fox

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06-11-2008 07:57 PM  9 years agoPost 10
GVpilot

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Denver, CO

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I just want to say that carbide is great, but what do you guys mean by "slow", carbide likes high surface foot speeds, so yes if you mean take short pecks into the metal yes, but higher RPM's for carbide. For example SF for 1018 with high speed steel drill 230 SF were carbide is 850 SF.

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06-11-2008 08:08 PM  9 years agoPost 11
jester4

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Brampton, Ontario

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Exactly, that's the point I was saying up top

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02-11-2009 06:18 PM  8 years agoPost 12
PDD

rrNovice

Medina Ohio USA

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Drilled out broken ez-out

Just had the problem and it can be done. You need some time and proper tools.

I broke off a Mac tools spiral ez-out in a 1/4-20 bolt I had broken off in my wood burning stove door.

Go to a machine tool supply shop, you will need carbide tools. Or you can order them on line. I bought a 1/8 and 3/16 carbide drill bits, also a couple 1/8 shaft carbide cutters with odd shapes.

One was a sort of ball head, my ez-out was broken at an angle and trying to center punch them can be a pain. I wanted to make a mark to guide the bit. The other was shaped sort of drill like but with more flutes than a conventional drill bit all the way to the bottom.

The ball shaped cutter did more than make a mark on the ez-out I was able to drill right through it using a 14.4 Craftsman cordless drill at the kitchen table. Dear wife wasn`t home.

Then I took the door out to the barn and clamped the drill shaped cutter in the bench drill and used it to enlarge the hole, it will side cut with steady pressure.

Once it was cutting easily like the remains of the ez - out was gone I just centered the hole and ran a couple of progressively larger drill bits through the hole and then a tap to clean out any remaining metal.

I didn`t even need to use the carbide drill bits, just the odd shaped ones, they were like 6 bucks a piece at the local machine tools supply shop.

Wood burner is like 19 years old and trying to find a replacement door was too much work, and to replace the wood burner now is around 1500 bucks.

The carbide tools are very brittle, you don`t want to be in a hurry, or use too much force.

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03-25-2009 04:30 AM  8 years agoPost 13
Makiedog

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Minneapolis

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A friend of mine did it for me on an EDM machine. It uses some sort of high powered electric spark to burn a hole through the shaft inside a bed of oil, the strangest thing I ever sawTook about 8 minutes to put a 3mm hole thru a 10mm shaft.

Pat L

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04-06-2009 01:21 AM  8 years agoPost 14
DKNguyen

rrApprentice

N/A

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lol. THat EDM was overkill!

But I thought EDMs cut things like with a hot sparking wire. So how did he "drill" a hole with it?

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04-06-2009 06:50 PM  8 years agoPost 15
MikeSherman

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Franksville, WI

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But I thought EDMs cut things like with a hot sparking wire. So how did he "drill" a hole with it?
For blind holes the process is called Sinker EDM....just from a quick search on Google:

http://www.edmtechnologies.net/sinker_edm.html

For thru-holes they may drill a small hole first and then feed the wire through to create the non-interrupted hole.

-Mike

Team QuickUK Pilot
Team Heliproz

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05-07-2009 04:50 AM  8 years agoPost 16
TMoore

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Cookeville, TN

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We commonly use EDM Drills that can put a .06" hole in 2 inches of Hardened D2 in 60 seconds.

TM

Delayed Response Operator Not Engaged

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08-19-2009 05:18 PM  8 years agoPost 17
IYKIST

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London united​kingdom

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I took some mainshafts to a precision engineering shop to drill some new holes on the shafts, he then put the shaft in the clamp and started to drill for about 2 mins with just a scratch on the surface, he just took the shaft out and said the shaft was too hard to drill.

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08-19-2009 05:33 PM  8 years agoPost 18
jester4

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Brampton, Ontario

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He didn't know what he was doing or was to lazy to do it. It takes a lot for something to be "undrillable"

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08-19-2009 10:33 PM  8 years agoPost 19
TMoore

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Cookeville, TN

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What sort of mainshafts are we talking about?

TM

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08-21-2009 05:48 AM  8 years agoPost 20
IYKIST

rrKey Veteran

London united​kingdom

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JR Vibe or Vigor main shaft

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HelicopterCAD - Engineering - Technical › Drilling Hardened Steel
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