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HelicopterAerial Photography and Video › is there a benefit to using a dslr versus​something like a sony v3 7.2
08-10-2007 05:01 AM  10 years agoPost 41
lowandslow

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Spring Hill, TN

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Actually I don't care what you think in this case but not in a negative way. I will tell you this, I'll put any of my V3 images up against any shot with a 7mp DSLR or any other P&S new or old.

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08-10-2007 05:03 AM  10 years agoPost 42
kiwidave1

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Seattle, WA

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Well, What are you putting up?? Come on, money where mouth is

David

Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

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08-10-2007 05:05 AM  10 years agoPost 43
lowandslow

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Spring Hill, TN

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Ok, brother let's roll.

http://www.dwkbiz.com/v3/

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08-10-2007 05:52 AM  10 years agoPost 44
FCM

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Surrey, England

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Buy a good second hand Sony R1 if you want what is for sure the best compact camera ever made for AP.

Paul.

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08-10-2007 01:00 PM  10 years agoPost 45
LTP

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Miami, FL

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I will stick with my original point of DSLR if you want to make money. If a client wants to make an 16 x 20 amplification like one of my clients likes to do, no P&S camera will give you a proffesional quality image at that size. My 20D or D5 will do it without a problem. With a P&S camera you will loose the client and not make money. You can't compare the quality of the clumsy lenses to those of the P&S. With a P&S you are also stuck with that one non-clumsy lens for all your work.

Ace, I'm sure you are a great pilot but take photography 101 at your local nightschool. You will learn a thing or two.

Lowland, the V3 was a good camera when it came out 2 or 3 years ago. The original digital rebel that I think was 6MP is a much better camera than the V3.

Luis

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08-10-2007 02:14 PM  10 years agoPost 46
FCM

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Surrey, England

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no P&S camera will give you a proffesional quality image at that size.
The R1 will thanks. My clients are very happy with the results we get from this cam.

Paul.

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08-10-2007 02:58 PM  10 years agoPost 47
aambrose

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Pana, IL

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Boy I would like to frame this statement and send it back to you in ten years. The POS you see today will not be the POS you see tomorrow when the demand for the obsolete SLR gets realized.
Go for it. I don't think big clumsy unnecessary and expensive lenses are going away anytime soon - not even in the next 10 years. If anything, the DSLRs and lenses will become even better. BTW, the last time I checked, the acronym POS meant something else.
As to shooting wedding with a point and shoot as some poster insisted that you are not suppose to do.
Let me clarify (if this was targeted at me). I didnt insist that a wedding should not be shot with a P&S. I was referring to Ace's insinuation that there is no need for DSLRs anywhere therefore implying that even wedding photographers could get by with only a P&S. Ask yourself this, if P&S cameras rivaled the photo quality and functionality of SLRs then professional photographers worldwide (sports, weddings, etc.) would be carrying them in their pockets and weigh 20 pounds lighter and not have to bother with pesky lenses and trips to their chiropractors! Who needs a $5000 lens strapped to a $5000 camera anyway when you can just whip out your P&S and get the same results! It's a conspiracy! We're all fooled!
As a matter of fact I once read an idea about bringing a bunch of disposable cameras and hand it out to some of the more out going guests and children and let them go wild to get your candid shots.
This is very common and a really fun idea, but if those cameras took the kind of photos professional wedding photographers strive for, then you would see professional wedding photographers all over the world doing their weddings with them. They have their purpose and that's for the guests to shoot candid shots. Does anyone seriously think the majority of professional photographers use SLRs just for the heck of it? Maybe it's because the cameras just look professional and cost a lot?

Not saying all P&S cameras are worthless. Just saying it's a personal decision as to whether you want to use one vs. a DSLR in your profession. Paul is exactly right -- if you are happy with the results of your P&S and so are your clients, then that's all that matters. There will always be differing opinions and photo quality is subjective -- choose what you feel works best for you.

Back to the original question: "ready to but a camera and looking for advice, using a trex 600 stock setup -- is there a benefit to using a dslr versus something like a sony v3 7.2"
In this case, the lighter weight and lower cost of the P&S would be the two biggest benefits IMO.


Tony

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08-10-2007 03:17 PM  10 years agoPost 48
lowandslow

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Spring Hill, TN

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Funny, I've done many 16 x 20's for clients with my V3. Stop by the San Diego County Club and take a peak in their board room and tell me they weren't done with a P&S. Made plenty of money over the years with my crappy V3. No one has complained yet, in fact just the opposite.

I'll never haul up a DLSR for R/C AP work. With the quality of P&S's these days it's just not necessary. However, for our equestrian and motor sports work a P&S would never do. I have a D200 and two D100's for that.

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08-10-2007 05:24 PM  10 years agoPost 49
aambrose

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Pana, IL

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Darrel,
I don't doubt you one bit. My opinion is that it should be a personal decision as to what type of camera (or any equipment) you choose for the job.

The sparks fly when someone tells someone else that what they're doing is less than optimal. Everyone knows if you want to do AP professionally, then you should always use a gasser (with a canopy), a DSLR, and a separate camera operator!
JUST KIDDING!!!!


Tony

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08-10-2007 05:30 PM  10 years agoPost 50
lowandslow

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Spring Hill, TN

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Your absolutely right. I just think saying a V3 is crap and you can't shoot professional level R/C AP without a DSLR is putting out misinformation. Nothing can be farther from the truth. With that said, you are correct, it is a personal choice as to what equipment you'll use.

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08-10-2007 05:38 PM  10 years agoPost 51
CKY

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Sunshine Coast, BC,​Canada

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What has been lost here is what works for AP.

Size, weight, cost(risk), and the logistics of mounting the DSLR to a heli severely limit its practicality. Not to mention all the great manual controls a DSLR has, either directly accessable with buttons/dials, or embedded in menus, are all lost when the heli is in the air. The only real advantage is a great lens selection and rapid operation/storage, plus its better ability to absorb some vibration.

What is amazing is what the POS cameras can now accomplish. The images do rival any DSLR in the 8x10 and less size, and many would argue larger sizes also.

But what is it that you are selling, web grade pictures, or 20 by 30 inch prints, and what setup will give you the best bang for the buck?

If chromatic aberation, purple fringing, barrel distortion, inconsistant focusing and shutter lag, lens flare, edge softness, DOF, ISO's, white balance, etc. etc. keep you awake at night, then the DSLR is a no brainer.

Hobbiest, professional, cheap, extravagant, that is the real issue.

Anything will work, just DO IT.

Chris

PS...DSLR on the mast, POS in the heli, works for me...

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08-10-2007 05:56 PM  10 years agoPost 52
AceBird

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Utica, NY USA

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As a matter of fact I once read an idea about bringing a bunch of disposable cameras and hand it out to some of the more out going guests and children and let them go wild to get your candid shots.
I have gone to weddings where there was one placed on every table. You would be suprised how many shots end up the wedding alblum.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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08-10-2007 06:03 PM  10 years agoPost 53
AceBird

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Utica, NY USA

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The only real advantage is a great lens selection and rapid operation/storage, plus its better ability to absorb some vibration.
Not really. there are industrial cameras that have fantastic C-mount lenses and a dslr is the worst for absorbing vibration.

I have to find a camera at work for a bore scope and I have come across some fantastic cameras used in the microscope world that aready exist. At 12 meg pixel they are far from cheap though.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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08-10-2007 09:50 PM  10 years agoPost 54
c130pilot

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Windsor, CO

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Another vote for the V3

We have been using the V3 since we started and have yet to get a single complaint from any of our clientelle. I, personally, am a huge fan of the camera for AP work. Reasonably small compared to DSLR's (for now), lots of capability, live video out, and a fantastic final image. We've done many enlargements that all look great (of course I'm biased). Most of our business comes from repeat customers and referrals and our clients include everything from custom home builders to the largest commercial developer in the region. Not trying to toot my own horn here as I know that there are many who do what we do with a far more impressive client list, but my point is that the V3 gives great images while balancing the needs required for hoisting it on an AP heli.

Tim
.

Help! I'm umop apisdn

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08-10-2007 09:57 PM  10 years agoPost 55
SeismicCWave

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Hilo, Hawaii

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<Let me clarify (if this was targeted at me). I didnt insist that a wedding should not be shot with a P&S. I was referring to Ace's insinuation that there is no need for DSLRs anywhere therefore implying that even wedding photographers could get by with only a P&S.>

No it wasn't directly targeted at you. I was making a statement based on the posts I read in summary.

<In this case, the lighter weight and lower cost of the P&S would be the two biggest benefits IMO.>

Exactly my sentiment. The original poster actually limit his choice by stating the actual helicopter that he will be using. In that case the Trex 600 is not a very good candidate for a DSLR.

However there are so many ego problems in this thread it has lost the intent to help the original poster. This thread has turned out to be a "my gun is bigger than your gun" show off posts.

The V3 images one poster attached are indeed very high quality and for most real estates use it is fine. As the saying goes you get what you paid for. That also goes to the type of clients you attract. Some clients do not need 16 X 20 prints. They just want something to post on their website.

Besides I don't know of any "professional" photographer with only ONE camera.

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08-10-2007 10:30 PM  10 years agoPost 56
SeismicCWave

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Hilo, Hawaii

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<still not sure what to buy but i feel like i am getting closer to making an educated purchase.>

One more issue you need to look at while checking out digital cameras. You need to find a reliable way to trigger the shutter. Granted a servo with a cam wheel will work fine but there are alternatives also. Some have program to automatically fire off a shot before the camera goes to sleep. Some camera have adjustable sleep time also. Some camera doesn't have any remote capability so you are stuck with a servo unless you open up the camera which is really not for the faint at heart.

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08-10-2007 10:37 PM  10 years agoPost 57
SeismicCWave

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Hilo, Hawaii

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>>Everyone knows if you want to do AP professionally, then you should always use a gasser (with a canopy), a DSLR, and a separate camera operator! <<

I prefer the Bergen Turbine Observer and the Hasselblad HD-39 with a 28 mm fix focal length wide angle lens. Not to mention the camera operator that wears a bikini to work.

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08-10-2007 10:55 PM  10 years agoPost 58
LTP

rrApprentice

Miami, FL

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Of course they will. No one likes to see their skills replaced by a technological advancement. But the consumer does because it usually means a lower price for the same product.
If this was the case we "Professionals" would still be using film. The honest truth is that any professional in any field has to keep up with modern technology or else fall behind. I remember the days of shooting a house with a 4x5 film camera and having to use Polaroid film to make sure you had the right exposition, angle, focus, etc. Then go to the lab and pray they don't screw up your work like it happened a couple of times. There was no Photoshop back then so the picture was final. If it came out over or under exposed, if something came out in the picture that was not supposed to like a lens cap or any other problem you had to re-shoot. I will not go back to those days because technology like photoshop and the fact that I see my picture instantly with a digital camera makes my job easier and I could do a job in about 25% of the time it took before. Believe me when I say that if I could change all my equipment for a camera that fits in my pocket I would. Maybe in 10 years, I hope, but not now.
It no longer requires great skill to take a great photo; it no longer requires great skill to pilot a helicopter
Nothing could be further from the truth. You could give the best camera in the world to a person and it doesn't mean they will take great pictures. It doesn't require great skill to take a great picture, I agree, it just takes great skill to take great pictures consistently.
Back to the original question: "ready to but a camera and looking for advice, using a trex 600 stock setup -- is there a benefit to using a dslr versus something like a sony v3 7.2"
In this case, the lighter weight and lower cost of the P&S would be the two biggest benefits IMO.
That's more or less what I pm'd the person who started this post. Work with your lifting equipment and work around those parameters.

Luis

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08-11-2007 12:52 AM  10 years agoPost 59
AceBird

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Utica, NY USA

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I agree, it just takes great skill to take great pictures consistently.
Does it take the same amount of skill to take the photo today as it took when you were using the 4x5 and the Polaroid? This is the point I was trying to make.

You are convinced that the lenses designed for film are better than the lenses (c-mount)designed for a ccd camera and this is where your thinking is not correct. You can definately see the P&S camera encroching on the SLR's edge of quality and I predict it won't be long before someone realizes that a c-mounted lens on an industrial camera is what the professional photographer has been waiting for. All the bells and whistles you like about the slr will be in your laptop that is connected to a small camera with a phone cable. And that same set up will be perfect for AP.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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08-11-2007 04:37 AM  10 years agoPost 60
LTP

rrApprentice

Miami, FL

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Does it take the same amount of skill to take the photo today as it took when you were using the 4x5 and the Polaroid? This is the point I was trying to make.
Same amount of skill, Less amount of time.
You can definately see the P&S camera encroching on the SLR's edge of quality and I predict it won't be long before someone realizes that a c-mounted lens on an industrial camera is what the professional photographer has been waiting for.
Maybe you are right. If a P&S comes along with an a everything you need lens that can replace the 5 lenses I take to work with me on a daily basis it would be FANTASTIC. It's just not here yet and until the technology arives I have to use my DSLR.

Luis

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