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HelicopterHIROBOOther › First nitro Evo50
08-06-2007 11:26 PM  10 years agoPost 1
Throttle up

rrNovice

Brooksville, Florida

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I just picked up an Evo 50 this is my first Nitro Heli. I’ve been flying planes for years now and also been flying a Trex. No forward flight yet just hovering around. I’m getting into nitro due to the limited flight times electric’s have. I can hover in all orientations (nose in isn’t pretty) however I personally needed longer run times and more visibility. The problem is I’v never set up a nitro heli just electric so I’m not familiar with the throttle hold, throttle cut and base idle settings do these settings interfere or coincide with your throttle curve settings? And how different is the throttle curve compared to an electric? Planes are easy, set it trim it and go. So basically any info would be great. I have a Futaba 9c and no governor.

Thanks, John

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08-06-2007 11:55 PM  10 years agoPost 2
Leif

rrElite Veteran

USA

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Throttle curves work with your pitch curve to give you a consistent head speed for a particular flying style. If you aren't using a governor you'll be looking for the following in your normal flight mode:

Idle at bottom stick, clutch engaging at about 1/4 stick with hover anywhere from half-stick to 3/4 stick. Maximum climb-out at top stick.

This is achieved by having a throttle curve that looks something like this:
100
75
55
35
15

With a pitch curve of something like:
+11 degrees
+8 degrees
+4 degrees
-1 degrees
-4 degrees

Since you're not going to be doing inverted stuff at this point this flight mode should work fine for initial hovering. The pitch curve will also work for autorotations if you have a flameout, so you can use the same pitch curve for "hold", just with the throttle at 15 for all points.

I'm assuming the engine will hold a reliable idle at 15%. If not, adjust that value to match whatever your reliable idle point is.

Leif

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08-07-2007 01:22 AM  10 years agoPost 3
rudyy

rrElite Veteran

E. Amherst, NY

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Throttle Cut: Your engine throttle is fully closed by turning the throttle arm clockwise. You can do the throttle cut only when the throttle stick is close to zero (around 5% I guess) on the throttle curve.

Throttle Hold: Throttle hold switch is for autorotation and serves as a safety trigger. I put the transmitter on throttle hold mode once I start the heli to prevent accidental firing up on the throttle stick. Again, the throttle hold setting shold be around 5%-8% of the normal throttle curve to let the engine in idle.

Hope this helps a bit.

Rudy

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08-07-2007 01:36 AM  10 years agoPost 4
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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Believe it or not, the EVO manual has a very good set of throttle AND pitch curve settings that work just fine as a great starting point for getting your EVO flying right.

Page 44 of the manual. Set the throttle linkage up as described in the manual, then dial in the curves. Fine tune as you fly.

Seeing as how you've never touched a nitro engine, perhaps your BEST bet is to find someone local who can help you get started, get the engine tuned properly so that you don't fry it, or end up with a poorly running motor.

No, the hold, throttle cut, and other settings don't interfere with each other.

If your radio is a "modern" computer heli radio, it will have a throttle hold mode -- set the throttle setting for the engine speed you want the motor to hold during practice autoroations, and set the pitch curve for shooting autos.

The remaining throttle and pitch curves will be set in their own separate menus for EACH different flight mode. If your radio supports a Normal, Idle up 1, Idle up 2 mode, and a Hold mode, you end up setting up four independent pitch and throttle curves. They DON'T interact.

If your radio doesn't have a separate throttle cut button, it's not rocket science to set one up. Set the throttle barrel so that at low throttle and low throttle trim, the barrel is fully closed (and the linkage doesn't stall the servo). If you do that, more than likely, at low throttle and low trim, you'll easily kill the motor. At low throttle and mid-trim, the engine will start and idle with the clutch disengaged. At low throttle and high trim, the clutch will engage and things start to spin...

Get local help the first time, someone who can teach you the ropes.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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08-07-2007 02:26 AM  10 years agoPost 5
lrogers

rrKey Veteran

Mobile, Al

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If you have been hovering a T-Rex, you are going to be in love with your EVO! I learned on my EVO and just recently got T-Rex (fun little bird). The Evo is a lot more stable in hover, is not effected as much by wind due to it's size and is easier to see farther off.

Larry Rogers - R/C Helicopter Pilot

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08-08-2007 01:33 AM  10 years agoPost 6
Throttle up

rrNovice

Brooksville, Florida

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Thanks for all the good info!

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HelicopterHIROBOOther › First nitro Evo50
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