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HelicopterBeginners Corner › Giving up
11-27-2006 04:17 AM  11 years agoPost 21
aarinsingh

rrVeteran

Thompson, MB

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Find a local club. See what they fly, and know. If you buy similiar products you will have support.

I suggest guys go with a .30 or .50 nitro too the bigger they are the more stable they are. The flip side is the smaller birds are cheaper to fix.

The best thing is still to see what the local guys have.

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11-27-2006 05:05 AM  11 years agoPost 22
JeremyZ

rrNovice

Round Lake Beach, IL - USA

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Throwing money at it will not help, frischman. To some here, "I can't afford it." means they will have to wait a week or two to buy their $3000 heli.

To others, it means the $200 sim will have to wait. You're one of those guys, and you cannot afford to learn on a real heli. I'm between those two levels, but much closer to yours, hehehe.

1) Do a Google search on FMS simulator.
2) Download & install it.
3) Go buy yourself either a dual analog USB controller (a good one, like Logitech) or if you have a proper transmitter already, a trainer/USB cord. Set it up, and fly on FMS. Go ahead, try the $3000 helis there. Crash them for free. Fine tune your coordination. Hundreds have done it, and for only the cost of a controller; $25 tops.

The hardest thing with helis is the basic coordination & orientation. Learning on a real heli without an instructor is going to be a spendy proposition.

To the hobby shop guy that is trying to sell the $570 T-Rex package, you mean well, but you're not doing those guys any favors. They can't afford to crash a T-Rex any more than anything else. Sell SIMS.

I learned on FMS first. Then a fixed-pitch Honeybee. (lucky the parts are cheap at bphobbies.com) Now, I'm practicing on AeroFly sim, which is better than FMS, as it should be, since it costs $200 instead of $0. In the meantime, I'm saving to put together my T-Rex properly and not spending very much at all to keey my Honeybee flying.

I hope you take my advice, and I hope you see it through. Put the Blade CP aside for a while. Sometimes, you just have to do that after a crash. You're too pissed off at the whole thing. Give it a day or two and learn on FMS.

Good luck, my man.

"Well begun is half done." -Aristotle

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11-27-2006 05:52 AM  11 years agoPost 23
George Matthews

rrElite Veteran

N.W. Ohio

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My post wasn't meant to imply anything negative towards you personally.
Having said this my best advise would be at the very least get a good simulator and make contact locally with folks proficient with helis. The simulator will give you good experience at a relatively lower cost. The reason you want to hook up with experience fliers is that practicing with a simulator and not understanding the whys and hows can develop some bad habits which in the long run can be of a impedance to your learning curve. The experience fliers can help you get off on the right foot with your simulator flying by making sure you have a decent working knowledge of what you are trying to accomplish.
But still there is no substitute for the real thing and if at all possible you should at the very least go the T-rex route along with the simulator as this is a viable heli. Now the best way would to invest in a 50 sized glow heli and get that help from the local fliers. Notice I said "invest" because this is exactly what you would be doing. Investing in the most viable and practical way to get off on the right foot so you will have a hobby that pays returns for years to come.

And to JeremyZ really if you can't afford to crash a T-rex then maybe just maybe this may not be the hobby for you. Yes as I stated the sim route is OK to get your feet wet and get a good working knowledge of the basics of flying. But the whole point is to get out to the field and fly. And there comes a time you need to maybe put other things aside and bite the bullet and make the commitment and get decent equipment.

George Matthews

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11-27-2006 08:43 AM  11 years agoPost 24
kraaijer

rrNovice

Linkebeek, Belgium

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I can only agree to what the others already said...

I learned to fly my Nexus 30 (very old machine) on my own and believe me, it cost me dearly... At that time there weren't a lot of "runryders" around to ask, and there weren't any clubs nearby either.
Still, I should've been more patient and look for help instead of trying to figure it out on my own.
I knew nothing about setting up a heli, try to fly that thing...

Good luck, I hope you'll follow the great advice given to you by so many people (and probably a lot of them learned it the hardway too!).

Ron

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11-27-2006 03:37 PM  11 years agoPost 25
wurthless

rrElite Veteran

Redding Ca.

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I will add this,,,
when you do fly take extra care to do it in a good place. I have a guy at work that's trying to fly indoors, last time the service truck was still in the stall and BAM right into the bumperThen he fixed it(main blades only) and went outside,,, but it was dark and he lost sight of it when it flew outta of the light,,,BAM BAM into the asphault,,,major repair. Put some training gear on, get in an open area, take baby steps and you will save some $$$$ ,,,good luck

QUICK! ,,,can someone turn the gravity off for just a second,,,,

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11-27-2006 07:38 PM  11 years agoPost 26
dialarotor

rrElite Veteran

Traverse City, Michigan

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Trying to learn on the BLADE CP forget it, IMHO. I have had to go in and scold two local hobbyshops for pushing the Blade CP on beginners walking in off the street. I have no problem with them selling a Blade CX, but the CP is NOT a first time helicopter. The customers end up coming to me. I took a Blade CP from one frustrated customer of the LHS to IRCHA. The project manager from JR worked on the helicopter and took nearly an hour to get the helicopter correct. Great service from JR and their people, but the heli is junk. I returned home and delivered the helicopter to the owner. I demonstrated the heli to him. Did all of this for no charge, but I felt so bad for this gentleman as he had over $350 in this POS. It is not a FIRST helicopter. I have been doing this long enough to know that. I have been working on other folks helicopters for a decade along with my own. Find a heli friend on RR and get with somebody to learn with, don't give up, you can do it, EBAY the BLADE CP.

Dialarotor

RapRexSynLog Pilot

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11-27-2006 07:41 PM  11 years agoPost 27
Effexor

rrNovice

Frankenmuth, Michigan

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Believe me I know exactly how you feel.

I bought a BladeCX, got pretty good at flying that around my house and decided to get a TrexSA and a Spektrum DX6, as the local HS supports both.

Spent a weekend+ putting the Trex together, another 4 hours at the HS with the fellow working on getting the gyro right. Took it home, smashed it into the road. I never had control of it.

$150 in repairs.

Got it into the air in my back yard. The wind took it and I dumped it into the grass. Never had control of it.

$75 in repairs.

Got it fixed. Had it in my kitchen to spool it up and check tracking. As soon as I hit the throttle hold, it went 100% power and flew into the door frame. Expensive and extremely SCAREY lesson on having the TX setup right and that I fully understand all the switches. I had it in stunt mode by accident.

$80 in repairs.

Took it to the HS and found out it wasn't balanced. Put some weights on the nose and the HS guy had it hovering perfectly. By this time I had learned to set up the heli fairly good. Took it home and went to an enormous grass field. Got it into the air, flies great, but NOTHING like the Blade I was used to. Over-correct, over-correct, over-correct, crash.

I walked into the house and told my wife "I'm done, until I get a SIM"

Another $75 to repair, and it's sitting there in pieces still.

Well I got the sim, and quickly realized how difficult it is to fly these things. I've had no less than a dozen people try their hands and without exception, they all crash exactly like I did at the big field.

Get a sim. I got the G3 and frankly I wish I had gotten it to begin with. It would have paid for itself already.

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11-27-2006 07:50 PM  11 years agoPost 28
dialarotor

rrElite Veteran

Traverse City, Michigan

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Hey experienced guys pass it on.
2 months ago I hosted a non AMA sanctioned beginner helicopter round-up with 2 other friends. No charge, I paid for the food. We had a great time, had 4 of us tuning and trimming all the helis, 2 simulators running, and a gasser on buddy box. Even had a full size USCG H65 Dauphin land and flew those guys on the sim and gasser. Point was we attracted 28 pilots from all over our region and got them going and got the machines running smooth. Most had been flying on their own, had tons of problems and questions. The day was a success and had no crashes. We will be doing this again in the spring even bigger and better. Since then we have meet 2 more times with the pilots close by. We have attracted 3 new pilots and 6 more helicopters have been purchased. Day after Thanksgiving we gathered again with a 7 of these guys. The following is the email my 2 friends and I got from one pilot. This is why we do it.

**********************************************

Hey hows things going.
I put in another 5 flights Saturday and Sunday and once I calmed downed I actually was doing some nose in hovering. I put it on its side in the deep grass towards the end but only slightly bent the fly bar, I tweeked it back as close to straight as possible and flew it some more " WHEW".

Hey thanks for letting us come up and learn from the Big Boys, and for tweeking my helicopter again. I know I don't say a whole lot when people are around but trust me I'm listening to you guys. The food was also great too, Thanks again. If I hadn't found Steve B. down at the Cadillac fly in and later you guys I would have probably quit. Being able to go to guys like you makes it real nice and keeps me fired up and flying.Your hospitality is AWESOME to.

Let me know when you get together again and who knows I might pop in, its worth the trip.

Thanks again,
Gary

-----------------

Big Dawg Pilots Pass It Forward. It's as much fun as doing flips and piros.

RapRexSynLog Pilot

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11-28-2006 12:53 AM  11 years agoPost 29
Stompy

rrApprentice

Northfield, MN - USA

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Well put JeremyZ, I'm with you 100%.

frischman - You CAN do it. it doesn't matter if it's a $200 Blade, or a $600 Trex. You can fly it, you just need to train your thumbs. Believe me, after just a few days with my brand new CP Pro I was very frustrated myself. But I was completely unwilling to give up. Thing was, I was just too impatient to get the training gear and sim that I knew I should be using before even trying to ground hover the thing. I got jumpy, decided I was better than all the other n00bs, and fired it up in the garage, tipping it right over onto its side. I replaced the blades, and now I have a slight wobble as a constant reminder that stupidity is always right around the corner.

But you know what? After just two more weeks, spent mostly on the sim, I can know hover tail in like I've been doing it for years. I'm now working on side in and when things go wrong, tail in is like my second home, I'm completely comfortable in that orientation. Not bad for two weeks scattered work eh?

Now, you can have all this, and more, for only $45. Check ebay. They ship from Australia so it'll take em a couple of weeks to get it to you, but it's more worth the wait than you can possibly imagine. You get the PRE-Flight sim with the CX, CP, and CP Pro all modeled, AND the interface cable to connect your transmitter to the computer. $45! You can't beat that.

It's all about learning how to move your thumbs, and how to move them VERY slightly that makes all the difference. Yes a larger heli is more stable, but they're no fun to hover around in a garage in the middle of winter.

Can you afford $45? If not, then just wait. Yes, give up. Stop completely, before you break more things. When you've got the money saved up, order the sim. Keep waiting, don't even bother plugging in the battery. Then, after you get the sim, practice on it for a week. THEN go try to hover again and I BET you you'll see a difference.

Yes, the CP/Pro is much more difficult to fly than anything bigger. But it/they still work just the same as any larger heli and by design, they all want to fly. All you have to do is make the blades spin fast enough, and keep em spinning flat. Sure it's easier said than done, but it's all about practice. Between you and me, the very first time I fired up my heli I actually did hover it. It wasn't pretty, but I didn't crash. What's my secret? Any chance I got, I played around with a sim and my friends' TX. I already knew how to fly A heli, I just didn't know how to fly mine. Now you need to learn to fly yours. You can do it. Don't give up.

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11-28-2006 01:11 AM  11 years agoPost 30
66Vetteman

rrNovice

Portland Oregon

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I'm right in there with you, last month I bought a CP Pro, let me tell you it's been rough attemting this on my own, but I can now hover the twitchey bastard, and fly it around, but I still get daring and loose it almost every pack. The point of this is to not give up, don't blame the machine, but learn from it and have a good time.

Rick

Thats all I need......the remote control.....and this

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11-28-2006 02:03 AM  11 years agoPost 31
Dave(DE)

rrNovice

Bear, DE - USA

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Cheap sim

I'm just starting too and am on my 5th battery pack without a rebuild of my CP pro. Started with an esky sim I bought on ebay for $25 plus shipping. It uses fms (which came with it on a CD). Once you can fly the three-dee model on FMS try the blade again. I spent 2-3 weeks with it before getting the heli.

Advice
Get the training wheels or make some - I used a quarter inch dowel cut in half and notched half way through the center. Use ties to band it to the landing gear. I strapped mine on top of the gear. Don't use a tie in the middle where the dowels cross, just on the 4 corners. Has saved me a dozen sets of blades already.

Watch the training videos on the blade forum for setup.

Wind is your enemy. I'm actually practicing hovering under lights in my driveway at night when it's calm. Start with the nose away from you. Nose in is tougher.

Modify the tail so it doesn't hit the ground. I used a piece of 1/2 long tubing over the end of the rod and drilled a hole in it for a wire to pass through. A piece of fairly stiff wire through the hole and extended to the tail boom, lashed to it with sewing thread and covered with 5 min epoxy does real well.

Good luck.

the truth shall set you free.

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11-28-2006 02:54 AM  11 years agoPost 32
JeremyZ

rrNovice

Round Lake Beach, IL - USA

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And to JeremyZ really if you can't afford to crash a T-rex then maybe just maybe this may not be the hobby for you. Yes as I stated the sim route is OK to get your feet wet and get a good working knowledge of the basics of flying. But the whole point is to get out to the field and fly. And there comes a time you need to maybe put other things aside and bite the bullet and make the commitment and get decent equipment.
Crashing a T-Rex is not too bad, from what I've heard. Around $50 typically? Building one is something else; that's more like seven hundo. That's not chump change for a kid working a minimum wage job, especially if he's got other bills.

I agree that the whole point is to get out to the field and fly. But to discourage people because they don't have a wad of cash ready to burn... that's just a shame.

Just this weekend, I got some good flights in on my $140 Honeybee. It has been a frustrating couple of weeks, waiting for the wind to die down to nothing, but between those rare few days and the weekly indoor flying, it was still worth it, even if it's a cheezy little 'copter.

Sometimes, I think the experienced (read: middle-aged & well-heeled) guys forget what it's like to be a broke kid with all this energy & desire... One valuable thing that a sim does is wet your whistle for more; encourage you not to give up.

"Well begun is half done." -Aristotle

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11-28-2006 03:07 AM  11 years agoPost 33
66Vetteman

rrNovice

Portland Oregon

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On the tail modification, I use an orange wire nut on the CF pin sticking down, it adds just enough area so if it hits it will slide instead of stick to asphalt or dirt.

Rick

Thats all I need......the remote control.....and this

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01-08-2007 11:06 PM  11 years agoPost 34
KnightRider

rrNovice

Folsom, CA USA

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I've only been in this hobby about three months. I bought a CP Pro and a G3 simulator to start with. In the first month I went through 14 sets of blades and still could not hover. I began to think that this is the WRONG hobby for me. The CP's reaction time was about ten times faster than my response time. LOL. During that time I noticed that I was making some pretty good progress on the simulator and was hearing on the forums that small electrics can be very hard to fly. So, I invested in a Knight 50 kit and put it together while I was still practicing. After the first gallon of fuel I can now hover (tail-in) for short periods of time and have not crashed__yet. Based on my experience and assuming you have the money to do it, I would certainly recommend a bigger, heavyer bird to start with.

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01-09-2007 12:42 AM  11 years agoPost 35
Yug

rrMaster

UK. Herts

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Cutting to the chase, do your self a BIG favour and get a sim, XTR, G3 or PHOENIX - bloody good. Take your time nailing orientation then have another go with your real heli. Crashing on the sim is free, currently I estimate I have saved over £6,000,000 in repairs

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01-09-2007 05:11 AM  11 years agoPost 36
HBKnew

rrNovice

Nashville,TN

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I give up

Well, not just yet but I'm tempted. Spend lots of $$ and time to repair only to have to start all over again. The instruction manual that came with it was so sad I laughted. (the directions for charging the battery was "charge battery properly and helicopter fly good" Mabey I am missing something in the Chinese translation.
I'm spending most of my time on repairs....a sim will be a welcome addition to the spare parts collecion I have gathered. I haven't given up yet but still have many unanswered questions about some probably basic functions that are on my tx that aren't documented anywhere.

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01-09-2007 10:05 AM  11 years agoPost 37
TrexRookie

rrKey Veteran

San Francisco, CA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

the heli that you have IS a pretty decent heli... but at the same time, is a very hard heli to fly. it irks me a lil bit with some of these smaller helis... people feel that the cheap price and small size means they're good to learn on, when in actuality, it's easy to learn on a larger one... more stable.. in any case, good luck, and if you need any help with anything, you know where to find us..

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01-09-2007 12:10 PM  11 years agoPost 38
andythilo

rrApprentice

Saffron Walden, Essex, UK

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My opinion based on my limited abilites and experience.

1) Find a local field and go see them, chat see what they fly.

2) Get a sim and start to learn to hover, learn how the controls. Probably best to get a sim with a controller as it'll be easier to get used to from the start.

3) If your enjoying it and can start to hover and potter about slowly then take the next step to getting your own NITRO heli. Forget electric for the moment and forget micros.

4) Buy a kit and build it yourself. Building and setting up will go a long way to helping you understand how it all works.

5) Find someone willing to train you, buddy box etc..

6) Take it slow, even if you dont do anything but hovering for a few gallons, it'll all build confidence. Learn how YOUR machine flys.

This hobby is expensive and has a steep learning curve. Orientation is the key, once you can hover tail in, nose in, side on, upside down inside out yada yada, it'll start to come together.

Oh and get training gear, a hula hoop is the best.

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01-09-2007 03:14 PM  11 years agoPost 39
RonRock

rrApprentice

Underwood, Iowa USA

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I have a Blade CX. I fly inside and have a blast with it. It is cheap to repair and easy to fly. It will help teach orientation and give you some flying time. They can be found on RR for around 125.00.

Not a replacement for a SIM but an option that will let you fly while practicing on the SIM. As most have said you really need a SIM.
The Blade CX is a Coaxial Rotor Heli which makes it very stable, but still a Heli with the same control inputs needed. It can be flown outside on a day with absolutely NO wind. Very fun and rewarding enough to keep you interested. At least it has been for me. I'm surprised it doesn't get suggested as a learning tool more often.

This Thing Has More Bugs Than a Big City Flop House.

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01-09-2007 04:08 PM  11 years agoPost 40
JLtrim

rrNovice

North Port, FL

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I'm learning on a "tricky" heli too frischman, the bcpp. I definitely have had my share of crashes also. But I'm trying to keep in mind that they say if you can fly these little guys you can fly anything... That's why I'm determined to learn it. I keep mine fairly low to the ground and dump the throttle if anything goes wrong and usually I'm flying again in no time. Every time I'm noticing how much easier it's getting to fly and repair it. Don't give up!

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