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HelicopterCAD - Engineering - Technical › trying to learn any auto cad
05-06-2005 02:39 AM  12 years agoPost 1
dr.overclocker

rrApprentice

clinton, ohio

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is there anything out there that is easy enough for a beginner? maybe something with directions lol. these free trials are nice but i just dont have a clue how to start and i definitely don't understand.
do you have to take classes on it or what? i don't have time to go back to school now but would love to get an easy to understand book or some kind of online tutor

full throttle... i'll figure it out from there

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05-07-2005 05:26 AM  12 years agoPost 2
teambukkakeraci

rrNovice

Central Illinois

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time and money
i am by no means a CAD expert but i took some classes in highschool and competed in a few national compatitions. it was all architectural so it dosent mean much here but CAD is CAD your just drawing different stuff. anyways if you are going to learn you might as well learn right. your best bet is AutoCAD it will cost you an arm and a leg but it is pretty much industry standard. it comes with a fat manual that will tell you how to do everything. it isnt a text book that is going to walk you through the learning process but i recomend giving yourself a project and when you have a question look it up. if you know someone that has autocad see if you can borrow a copy and see if you like it before investing the money. i actually learned on some software called intellicad which is a much cheaper program and uses many of the same commands as autocad and makes for a smooth transition between the two. if this dosent sound like the route to you take a class and get some basics down then play with it. the beauty and the downfall of cad is that there is almost a limitless number of ways to do the same thing so its easy to learn because you will generally be able to figure out some way to do something but at the same time it takes a lot of experiance to learn the most effeciant way to do it.

Good luck,
Branden

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05-07-2005 05:28 AM  12 years agoPost 3
TMoore

rrMaster

Cookeville, TN

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Learn 2D drawing first with a package like Intellicad, AutoSketch or DesignCad. Once you are comfortable on a $100.00 system designing on a 3D system will be more intuitive.

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05-08-2005 05:13 AM  12 years agoPost 4
rcnut243

rrNovice

Yukon, Oklahoma

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AutoCad
I took AutoCad in a vo-tech.
I love it I am a machinist by trade and have always had an interest in the drawings I worked from. Any way back to the point.

Autodesk which to the author of Autocad has there own brand of text books that do take you step by step through the learning process.

it will take you from basics with projects at end of each chapters all the way to 3d drawing.

I now do all the autocad work for our job shop machine shop that i work for as well as the machine programming for the CNC machines(which is also CAD related)

Drafting is a very rewarding career. I wish I had the experience to do it full time.

any way didnt mean to ramble on. The point is that yes there are step by step books out there available it just depends on how much your willing to spend.

I even have one of my text books I would be willing to part with if your interested its on AutoCad version 14 but the basics are all the same.

I would let it go for $40 was $150 new.
let me know if interested.

Rcnut243 ,Xcell 50, AMA #785322

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05-08-2005 04:19 PM  12 years agoPost 5
dr.overclocker

rrApprentice

clinton, ohio

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thanks alot for the ofeer on the book i may be interested in it.
i just bought autocad 2002 for dummies lol. let me see how this pans out with this book first. i may get yours too tho as from what i hear, you cant have to much info when it comes to auto cad

full throttle... i'll figure it out from there

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05-08-2005 04:41 PM  12 years agoPost 6
dgshaffer

rrElite Veteran

New Jersey

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There are a few different authors for books out there. Do yourself a favor and pick up one of each. They all have different approaches to writing. I forget which book I found most helpful but it wasn't the one written by AutoCAD.

2D may suit you but if you really wish to have fun then dive right into 3D. 2D drawings are a pain in the ass to modify once you find a design issue. With a 3D model, your paperspace views are automatically updated once the model is corrected and the actual drawing is reopened.

I'm self taught and after only 3 years I landed a position as a Senior Design Engineer in a Semiconductor manufacturing company. Anything is possible with the right devotion.

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05-24-2005 05:48 PM  12 years agoPost 7
sbalder

rrApprentice

Brighton, Michigan

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It might be helpful if you told us what you want to do. We've heard from people with different backgrounds and perspectives in this thread.

Here's mine:
I bought a lathe/mill combo a few years ago to support my heli interests. I had not done any machining (other than a brake rotor) prior to this. I made several parts including a rotor head (see my gallery for pics). These first parts were drawn crudely on paper as I had been taught a long time ago in 7th grade shop class.

Wanting to improve my designs I downloaded a free version of TurboCAD which supported 2-d only. With practice, I was able to document my projects and then to do my designs from scratch in them. Last fall I upgraded to a new version of TurboCAD which has more features and supports 3-d. I have not applied the time to learn 3D yet, but will be doing so in the future.

I converted my mill to CNC and, of course, all of my designs now need to be in CAD or else I would have to spend days writing g-code for the mill.

My Point: If you want to be a hobbyist and design a few parts, you can fumble around in your spare time like me and create good designs like me. Alternatively, if you want to make a career/job out of this I would suggest investing in good tools, software, books, formal training and applying the discipline that this field takes.

As for me, I'm happy to have fun calculating feed rates based on the point at which the cutter snaps in half!

-Steven Balder

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05-27-2005 04:23 AM  12 years agoPost 8
tyuditsky

rrApprentice

Where the grass is green and the girls are Pretty.

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First step - get a boss who is technicially chanllenged

Second step - tell him it's time to upgrade....

Third step - take the company credit card and order a $3,800 single user license for AutoCAD2006.

Fourth step - feel all giddy inside

Fifth step - new version draws for you, just sit back and enjoy!!!!

Evo90, HyperRaptor, T-Rex

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05-28-2005 08:30 PM  12 years agoPost 9
Highlander

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Angus, Scotland

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At work we have AutoCAD and ProEngineer. AutoCAD is the best 2D drafting system I have used, in my opinion it outperforms the 2D drafting options in ProE and I-Deas which I used a few years ago.

AutoCAD is pretty straightforward to use and gets my vote everytime. In the past I used the 3D part of AutoCAD 13 to draw up a 3D gear system and then had it rapid prototyped for a new job we were working on.

Helicopter: A whole bunch of metal fatigue circling an oil leak. (Burt Rutan)

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06-28-2005 03:15 AM  12 years agoPost 10
warren52nz

rrNovice

Auckland, New Zealand

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I have a complete set of AutoCad original manuals for Release 12 which is old now but most of the commands are still available by just typing them in.

There are about 7 text books and a few other smaller ones in an AutoCad box. Together they're almost a foot thick!

Tried to upload a photo but it won't let me. ???

The softwatre isn't included but you should be able to pick up a used version for pittance by now.

Shipping from New Zealand might be a killer but for, say $20 + shipping you can have them.

warren@jda.co.nz

Warren - Century Elite 3D Pro

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06-28-2005 03:54 PM  12 years agoPost 11
wings

rrApprentice

Stafford, UK

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Newer versions of AutoCAD have much better interfaces and much more functionality (2006 is superb). I am Applications Engineer & teach AutoCAD, Inventor and ProEngineer. Learning from books can be time consuming but if you are disciplined then you can get there. Otherwise there is no substitution for good instruction from reputable instructors - There is a lot of very helpful knowledge out there that isn't in any book!

Good luck, CAD gets easier when you have grasped the basics.

If you have any specific questions i will gladly try & answer them.

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07-17-2005 04:01 AM  12 years agoPost 12
Lost Horizon

rrNovice

Victoria BC

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My two cents:

Having taught AutoCad and used it since 1987, and lately having designed 3 Heli's using Rhinoserous, I'd have to say forget AutoCad and use Rhino.

Dana
http://rceheli.com/skunkworks/skunkworks

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07-17-2005 02:57 PM  12 years agoPost 13
CLSSY56

rrApprentice

Waterloo IL

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You can't be a draftsman over night.... it takes practice and lots of learning. I've been using autocad for 10 years and I still don't remember everything. I've been trying to get my boss to upgrade to 2006 as we use 2000 at work. I have also used MicroStation which I think is also a good program and has better customer service as they will support the first versions where AutoCAD will only go back to 2002. The only good thing about AutoCAD is that it's cheaper then MicroStation.

-Travis
HorizonRcFlyers.com

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07-17-2005 07:11 PM  12 years agoPost 14
Topher

rrVeteran

Rochester, Michigan

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If you can, get the student version of solid works. I think its like $140 for 2004, or if you are in college you can probably get it for free. I know AutoCAD, SW, Catia, Delmia, a little Pro-E, inventor, mastercam, and a few others. Out of all of those solid works is definatly the easiest to learn on. I first learned AutoCAD back in high school and for architecture and 2D plans its pretty tuff to beat. But when it comes to more advanced stuff like solid modeling, assemblys, kinematics, and so on, solid works is pretty easy to use and features COSMOS which does everything for you. And solid works help files are much better than AutoCADs. If you want my two cents, learn SW, then go to AutoCAD because it will then be much easier to learn.

will wash your heli for a quarter

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10-02-2005 12:55 AM  12 years agoPost 15
3Dx

rrElite Veteran

Monterrey NL

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Make shore you start with SolidWorks is the best 3D cad ever don’t waist your time
In Autocad.

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10-03-2005 09:31 AM  12 years agoPost 16
pelo

rrNovice

milano

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Solide Edge, easy and complete software!

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10-03-2005 07:43 PM  12 years agoPost 17
wings

rrApprentice

Stafford, UK

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not many people mentioning autodesk Inventor? its as simple and more powerful than solid works and has complete integration and compatibility with autocad files (dwg). Gets my vote for the money, Inventor and Solidworks are the real players in terms of simple to use but powerful cad software, my advice if you are new to 3d modelling is to stick to one of these. You can grasp the basics in no time and the software is capable enough when you get more advanced.

Just my opinion, though this is also my profession.

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10-03-2005 07:51 PM  12 years agoPost 18
Pole

rrApprentice

Norway

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Solide Edge, easy and complete software!
'

jupp... Solide Edge is great..

Here is a rotorHub i`m gone make...

Stay tuned fore more happy days

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10-04-2005 09:39 PM  12 years agoPost 19
bbeverlie

rrKey Veteran

Hudson,New Hampshire.USA

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I have been an autocad user for 10+ years and 3d is difficult to say
the least. Autodesk makes a program called inventor and version 11
is out, This is the program to use if you have autocad because you
can bring 2d drawing into inventor and make them 3d.

It's better than solidworks ( which I also have ) for the last reason
stated plus the following.

You can take a free test drive (4 hour class ) at any autodesk dealer and you get the basic idea + a free 30day disk to try, They also give you a book with the disk again free.

If you buy inventor you get the autocad 2006 with it free.

Version 11 now includes presenter 3d, making backgrounds like offices
a snap with special lighting effects.

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10-12-2005 03:55 PM  12 years agoPost 20
rng0599

rrNovice

Erial, NJ

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Solidworks Is Absolutely The Way to Go
Try getting solidworks. I can give you some lessons. I have a catalog of tutorials I created.

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HelicopterCAD - Engineering - Technical › trying to learn any auto cad
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