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belt cp as a first heli

hedgehog

Senior Heliman

wapakoneta, ohio united states

hello everyone in the beginners corner seems to think it would be a wast of money for me to buy a belt cp as my first heli, just thought i would ask the same ?? here. I have flown a small coaxial heli and I got bored with it pretty quick. Just wondered what the gen opinion was on the belt cp thanks guys.

12-14-2008 Over year old.
rhampton

Senior Heliman

clearwater, fl - usa

that's gonna be a challenge for u to Fly for the first time...anything is possible tho..it requires some patience on your part..reading forums and asking like your doing is the best thing u can do to start off...

I'm sure everyone will agree that a Simulator would be the best practice..(real Flight 3.5)...u can Fly all type of helis there and get a reasonable idea before u fly the real deal...

Check out http://www.xheli.com/2rche.html

They have a variety of Helis here from beginners to intermediate to advanced. And prices are pretty decent..you can get a RTF Heli for under $100...
if i were moving from a blade CX type Heli and wanted to advanced,,,i problably would be looking at a Blade 400. but it's all how much u wanna spend...Parts are readily available for this Heli and mostly what i have read is good reviews and it has had good success so far.

Good luck on your search tho..i'm sure many Adanved Pilots r gonna have there share in posting a response here...

Let us know what u decided to get...

Reggie

12-14-2008 Over year old.
tryan02

rrProfessor

Canton, Missouri

The biggest advantage between a BeltCP and a B400 is the B400 DX6i radio a good radio can move on to a different heli after you move up. I myself took a much longer road in this hobby which was very expensive with much harder to fly smaller helis than a beltcp.

I have a TREXSEV1 $400 kit $100 servos $120 gyro $220 radio. Its a great setup but would you really want to spend that much to learn?

Oh and with the $155 BeltCPV1 from Xheli.com you probably would want to add a HH gyro for another $50 or so. Also you do know the V2 just came out right? but its $255.

So its up to you spend $700+ for the better stuff or a couple hundred to get your feet wet.

Oh now to your question with a question how could it be a waste of money if you learn to fly a RC heli one of the hardest RC vehicles for under $200?

No Really I am the club President!!!

12-14-2008 Over year old.
HOMEPAGE  
tutelar-rc

Key Veteran

Nobleton, Ontario - Canada

I really like my Belt CP. Any 400/450 size helicopter will be a little intimidating the first time you spool it up.

Whatever heli you get, make sure you have a ready supply of spare parts. Nothing worse than making some progress, only to have to wait for parts.

Good luck!

12-14-2008 Over year old.
Gregor99

Elite Veteran

Western Wa

The Belt CP can be a fine first heli. But in a years time, it could be money you'd wish that you had put towards something else. While it does fly and you can learn on it far easier than a smaller heli, it won't take long before you start wishing for "upgrades".

If you are sure that heli's are your thing, start investing in the setup that you will not outgrow in less than a year. A decent radio and any one of the great 450s on the market would work as a solid trainer. But will still find a place in your fleet once you've move past the basic skills. I'd focus on models that are cheap to crash and have good parts availability. While the Trex 450 is not the best 450 on the market, parts costs and availability can't be beat.

If you aren't sure helis are for you and don't want to sink a grand into it to find out, the Belt is a good way to answer that question. However, the cost in upgrades and down time will be your "interest" payments that can avoid by getting a quality kit up front.

If you must go the Belt route, be sure to at least get the v2. That will stave off some off the desire for imeadiate upgrades.

Lastly, a SIM is highly recommended. Most pilots use them and it really helps, especially in the begining. Because there is some amount "translation" that is required to migrate sim skills to the real thing, I'd recommend getting a sim at the same time you get the real heli. It works best if you can master a move on the SIM and then imeadiately start work on it with the real heli. Don't move on with the SIM until you can do it with the real heli.
i also read that the 25 amp esc in the belt cp isn't enough and sometimes catches on fire
This is usually because the Esky BEC is underrated. An outboard BEC is $12. Don't worry about not understanding what I just said. We'll talk you through it

Revolectrix Dual Powerlab Beta Team

12-14-2008 Over year old.
!2Old2Fly

Key Veteran

North Bend, WA

I'm reasonably new to helis, but am an old hand with fixed wing.

The first thing you need to accept is that it almost doesn't matter what your first heli is, as long as it's not a Blade CP (don't let a LHS talk you into one of those!).

At this point, your fingers & brain won't know the difference between a HBFP, a HBK2, Belt CP, or a Blade 400... or what ever you get. And by the time you CAN tell the difference, you'll have learned enough of the basics that you'll be much better informed on what your "second" heli should be, and THAT's the one that will be with you longer. Because by the time you get past the initial learning stages, you'll pretty much have beat the first one to death.

In fact, if you were looking for heli that flies nice & gentle to learn on, you don't want a micro, or a mini at all, they fly terrible. The best place to start would be either a Raptor 30, or a Kyosho Caliber 30. Both wonderfully stable, and docile helis. But they're large, and expensive.

Things to look for in your first heli:

-> If you have a club near by (check with an LHS), go down, and see what they're flying. Get something that is well supported by your local flyers.

-> Parts availability! Get something that you can get parts for locally. There's nothing more frustrating than breaking parts, just as you're getting the hang of it, only to have to wait a week for the UPS truck to show up! This will most likely mean you're looking at a Trex, or a Blade 400.

-> Repair costs. Stay away from the bling. You don't need a carbon fiber frame, with a CNC head. Stick with plastic for now, you're just going to break it anyway.

-> Put training gear on it! They won't save you from a real crash, but they can prevent a tip over. And even a small tip over means broken parts!

If I were to recommend a starter heli, I'd have to say a HBFP. You'll have to order parts, because LHS's don't carry them. But just be sure to order a good stockpile of spares when you order the heli, and be ready to be putting in regular orders for more spares.

That little heli is hugely supported on other forums, and there is tons, and tons of advice out there for it. It's simple in structure, and cheap and easy to fix if you have a not so graceful landing. Many times, quick field repairs can be made, that will have you back in the air without having to go home.

As you progress, there are many upgrades that can be done to it that will extend its usefulness. By the time you outgrow that, you'll be more than ready to move up to a CP heli, and enjoy a lot more success with it.

And... They're inexpensive to buy. In fact, I just saw where one of our members (from this forum) was selling two of them together for $80. Dunno if he sold them yet or not, but if you watch the classifieds, you can pick up great deals on them.
You can't hardly go wrong with one of those.

Yet Anohter IT Worker

12-14-2008 Over year old.
TJinGuy

rrProfessor

Socorro, NM - USA

I am of the belief that good hardware will greatly aid you in the learning process. Now that has less to do with the airframe you choose and more with the other components. All 400/450 sized helis will fly well with a good set of supporting components. These components will likely cost much more than the airframe but are worth every penny. So now I will revisit your question.

"Belt-CP as a first CP heli?"

The Belt-CP airframe is a very acceptable base for first heli. I would steer clear of the RTF though and just buy the bare bones kit. Then I would buy each supporting component very smartly. You don't have to spend a ton of money but you will definitely spend more than the cost of the RTF. You need to be ready to spend $500 at a minimum and more like $600-800. If you can't handle that then you are looking at the wrong hobby because anything cheaper will either not be a real heli or be extremely difficult to learn on. Just ask anybody here now much their $200 RTF has cost them in the long run.

My final point is that there are many 400/450 helis to choose from and most airframes are within $100 of each other. With that knowledge, a TRex450S or Mini Titan E325 actually look better than the Belt.

- Chris

Team New Mexico
TJinTech

12-14-2008 Over year old.
HOMEPAGE  
tryan02

rrProfessor

Canton, Missouri

a TRex450S or Mini Titan E325 actually look better than the Belt.
The statement below is assuming you cant get much help from a local club or hobby shop.

But we forgot to mention the best route the classifieds you can buy some very good used helis and equipment around 1/2 price. While I dont recommend this to someone new to the hobby for obvious reasons. Just post a link in the Esky forum or ask the question and we'll all help you out. Youll find most of us own these helis also with our Esky products. Take a look at our profiles for those of us that have them filled in you'll see there is a cornucopia of hands on knowledge and experience for all the models.


Let us know your decision and good luck just remember its tough but worth the effort.

No Really I am the club President!!!

12-14-2008 Over year old.
HOMEPAGE  
rhampton

Senior Heliman

clearwater, fl - usa

QUOTE>>>---------------------------------------------------------------
The best place to start would be either a Raptor 30, or a Kyosho Caliber 30. Both wonderfully stable, and docile helis. But they're large, and expensive.<<<<
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

r u kiddn? why encourage him to get a large bird......if he's gettin board with a Blade CX,,u certainly dont want him to move right away to a Raptor 30sz Heli...ohh no no no........
The power alone will make him give up and take up Knitten or somethin....

Please now....

let's start with the basics again.........

get the SIM,,,Practice,,,and Practice,,,,when u feel you can hover the cp's the 400's,,,the 450's then you will be a little more mature in your decision...it helps to get good advice from the people above as well so i hope your takn all this in.....

Gregor99 made a good point about investment...get a good that u think u might want to keep....if u go for a cheapy,,,u might regret it,,,but at the same time if your budget only allows for a cheapy then u have to use your own Judgment......it's all up to u my friend....

we wanna hear from ya..

Reggie

12-14-2008 Over year old.
blade blaster

Senior Heliman

N.C USA

Good point 2old!! i'm beatin my king2 to death,and am glad parts are cheap!!

12-14-2008 Over year old.
tryan02

rrProfessor

Canton, Missouri

yeah but greg is still flyin the heck out of his even cheaper king2. Thats mainly cause a lot of us Esky fans started with the little motored gear drive tailed mixer helis. that are virtually impossible for a beginner to learn on. And dumped tons of cash in them before moving up.

I disagree with the 30 size hatred it would be the best thing to learn on if and only if you had a local club with an instructor to teach you setup, safety and flying.

But if your not so lucky yeah cheap electric crash rebuild and repeat. I dont understand the mentality of always buy the best. Dont waste money on cheap stuff. Its just not true your gonna throw money away in this hobby on a regular basis get over it.

As for sims I'll start using one when they keep track of money spent buy your first heli cost of upgrades and let you setup a respectable heli budget. When you spend your budget you have to wait till payday to buy parts.

Come on G5 lets make these sims lifelike.

No Really I am the club President!!!

12-14-2008 Over year old.
HOMEPAGE  
racin06

Key Veteran

Indianapolis, Indiana

hello everyone in the beginners corner seems to think it would be a wast of money for me to buy a belt cp as my first heli, just thought i would ask the same ?? here. I have flown a small coaxial heli and I got bored with it pretty quick. Just wondered what the gen opinion was on the belt cp thanks guys.
I think the Belt CP is a fine heli and yes, you can learn to fly on the Belt CP or any other larger heli; however, are you committed to cash leaving your wallet and downtime for repairs each and every time you crash? If so, then go for it. If not, I recommend the route I took by starting out with a high-end sim (Phoenix RC, Real Flight, Aerofly Pro, Reflex XTR) and the ESky Honey Bee FP. I spent less than $60.00 in crash repairs learning to fly the HBFP. That will not be the case with the Belt CP or any other 450 size or larger heli. Just my $.02 on the subject .

By the way, regardless if you start out with an FP or a CP heli, you are about to get an eye opening experience coming from a coaxial heli. However, just keep plugging away...you'll get there.

12-14-2008 Over year old.
rhampton

Senior Heliman

clearwater, fl - usa

Let's put him in one of these....haha....had to throw a little humor in here..

Reggie

12-14-2008 Over year old.
toolman18

Elite Veteran

Portland Tx

Get the best heli you can afford to crash.

12-14-2008 Over year old.
McRex

Veteran

Halls, TN-USA

Get yourself a good sim first! That is crucial, it will save you so much money in the long run! Next, the bigger the heli, the more stable, I love the T-Rex 450/B400, but if you could save a bit longer and get a larger heli, possibly a good used one, you will be doing yourself a huge favor. I made the mistake of starting out smaller with no sim, and paid for it with parts. Just my opinion from my experiences.

Daniel, AMA # 923248

12-14-2008 Over year old.
HeliFisher

Veteran

Verdi , Nevadafornia

What McRex said!!

+1!!!

The less a man makes a clarative statement, the less likely he is to look like a fool in retrospect.

12-14-2008 Over year old.
vortechZ230

Elite Veteran

Michigan, U.S.A.

Get the Phoenix Sim, and a good training gear for the heli, you will go far quickly!

Blue skies, Light Winds!

12-14-2008 Over year old.
HOMEPAGE  
!2Old2Fly

Key Veteran

North Bend, WA

"If you have help" at a local flying field, a rappy 30, or Caliber 30 are excellent trainers. They fly smooth, and are magnitudes more stable than any 400-450 size heli made.

I would not recommend someone try it solo, but with help, they're a great choice, and in fact, I've seen many Rappy 30s sold as "Trainers", when the owners moved up to a larger heli.

These little electrics are not especially the best trainers out there. Everyone just gets locked into that mentality because they're small, and relatively cheap. But that's not always the best answer.
Their size and cheapness comes at the expense of stability.

Yet Anohter IT Worker

12-15-2008 Over year old.
toolman18

Elite Veteran

Portland Tx

I have to disagree with you 2old. I could never get enough stick time because i was always dragging out all the equipment it takes to run a nitro. I might have got 8 flights a week. With the electric. i was getting at least 30 flights a week. I could put in a battery and be flying in my garage in seconds. Its to easy. No messing with needle settings. Just put it on the floor and practice hovering in all orientations. Its convenient and quick. It took me to the next level.

I will agree that the 30 size are more stable but they are more expensive to repair. Until you have the basics down i would get the belt cp. It took me through about 600 flights. I sold it for about 40 bucks less than i bought it for. No big loss there.

Get a good set of TG and practice hovering all orientations. Until you are good at that you are only taking shortcuts. If you cant hover all orientations it will hurt you in the long run.

Something else to consider is a 30 size machine will kill you. Make a wrong move and its off with your head. Id rather make a mistake with a little guy in a wind free zone(garage) and drop it on its TG. No big deal there. Maybe a boom strike.

Brad

12-15-2008 Over year old.
McRex

Veteran

Halls, TN-USA

a T-Rex 600 parts wise is about the same as a 450 size, excluding blades of course.

Daniel, AMA # 923248

12-15-2008 Over year old.
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belt cp as a first heli

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